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ROCHEDALE AREA Preliminary Ecological Protection Report

By Brisbane Region Environment Council

with financial support from the Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Committee (B4C)







Figure Two - Map of Identified Landbridges and Corridors in the Rochedale Study Area

Rochedale Ecological Corridors Map

Oveview

Ecological Priorities

  1. Retain Waterways
  2. Retain Remnant and VPO Vegetation
  3. Retain Rural Open Space
  4. Connect vegetated areas to each other and to waterways
  5. To provide linkages between Koala Coast Bushlands and Bulimba Creek

Bush Corridors

EC1 North South - On eastern side of the study area Prebble St to Underwood Rd

EC2 East West - Between Priestdale and Miles Platting road

EC3 East West - Bulimba Creek to Grieve Rd

EC4 East West — Bulimba Ck - Preeble St to Farley St

EC5 Under M1 freeway

EC6 Under Gateway freeway

Rural Open Space Corridors

SR1 East West — Gardner Rd to Rochedale Rd

SR2 East West — Gardner Rd to Rochedale Rd

SR3 North South — Ford Rd to Cnr Priestdale & Rochedale Rd

Fauna Crossings

5 Crossing on Rochedale and Grieve Rds

5 Crossings on Gardner Rd

Waterways

8 Waterway corridors

Bulimba Creek

4 smaller creeks in Area 1

2 smaller creeks in Area 2

1 smaller creek in Area 3

Rehabilitation Priorities

 

 


Cover Letter

Councillor Helen Abrahams

Chair of Sustainability and Environment Committee

Brisbane City Council

Fax 34072831 fax 34038607

Re Rochedale Masterplan Overview

Dear Councillor Abrahams,

Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Committee (B4C) has commissioned a brief report upon the Rochedale Local Area Plan precinct. This is triggered because of three or more Council processes overlapping in the area and the continued lack of availability of the completed Brisbane City Council data on the site.

Further B4C identifies the need to revegetate on a broad scale, integrating rural landscapes, remnant bushland and riparian corridors.

The report highlights listed landscape actions, policy initiatives and a green space network (see map). It suggests urgently required fieldwork (previously recommended circa mid 2003) be undertaken to meet scientific norms, supporting information requirements and to form adequate baseline decisions.

B4C requests this report be submitted to the Masterplanners and the Environmental Consultant.

PRIORITY ONE - Early Rehabilitation Actions -

The B4C/BREC Report prioritises some corridor selections, applied principles and actions within the themes of broadscale revegetation of rural lands and fauna protection

GATEWAY.

The Prebble Street underpass exercise is a high profile win-win number two priority previously recommended.

WATERWAYS

Most waterways have a varied need of rehabilitation, but look positive in assumed reduction in water use and return of environmental flows and ecological functions. The creeks form a framework for half the corridors. Waterways designation is urgently needed over all the creeks and tributaries. The beds, banks and riparian zones should be transferred to BCC, particularly at Austral Bricks (in order to monitor the creek etc.).

LAND USE

Some of these competing land uses foreshadowed in the Technical Report would produce unmitigatable impacts on Landbridges EC1 and EC2, including the bulk of future residential

The bushland and environs on School Road East need quarantining from Residential A, medium/high rise development and small lot development.

The Special Investigation Area on Grieve Road should be withdrawn and independent multi-disciplined experts should write sequential reports.

There is an urgent need to examine the impacts of existing and future Austral Bricks activities in the study area as they will affect a number of corridors, in particular the impacts of increased truck movement from quarries on Ford Road and other major road upgrades.

ECOLOGICAL FACTORS

Because of the unacceptable loss of old growth trees and a diverse range of hollows, measures such as the placement of possum, bird, bat and bee boxes is virtually mandatory in the study area.

The identification of hydraulic functions and relationships of the Rochedale soils, surface waters and at least 3 aquifers is poorly modeled and documented. This warrants early rectification by detailed analysis.

Because of the S.P.P.1/97 and the RNCS Biodiversity Planning Assessment v.3,3, it is therefore important to retain remnant vegetation and rural openspace within the proposed village, to enable revegetation of critical Landbridge linkages to Bulimba Creek, Priest Gully and the Koala Coast for state, regional and local fauna purposes.

CULTURAL HERITAGE

It is recommended that three full and comprehensive surveys be undertaken -

Indigenous Traditional Knowledgeholder Environmental Impact Study

Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Holder Cultural Heritage and Cultural Resource Study, and

Management Study and Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Holder Environmental Management Plan.

CONCLUSION

There exists a failure to provide or retain landbridges, sufficient forest and koala habitat and failure to obtain traffic/fauna separation for all upgrade roads in the precinct, such as the M1, the Gateway Arterial and part of Mt Gravatt-Capalaba Road. These will trigger further decline in the local and regional koala, and range of other fauna populations in the area. Opportunities exist for the retention, restoration and rehabilitation of native vegetation as well as retaining areas of rural open space into the future.

Your assistance in the matter could verify the status of recommendations and enable a number of groups to get on with the job.

Yours Sincerely

 

 

 


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ROCHEDALE AREA Preliminary Ecological Protection Report

By Brisbane Region Environment Council

Writing Team: Ted Fensom, Dave Gasteen, Shane Coghill, Michael Petter

This survey was commissioned by Bulimba Creek Catchment Coordinating Committee (B4C) in late December 2003 as a preliminary study to Brisbane City Council programs on Waterways, the Rochedale Village Masterplan and the Rochedale Local Area Plan.

The Brief.

The major components are to identify the waterways, landbridges, openspace corridors, and disjunct bushlands of the greater Rochedale precincts and some of their function, condition and viabilities.

The urgency of the report precludes community consultation, local vegetation mapping, botanical collecting, a reasonable cultural landscape evaluation and retrieval of about 20 varied reports on the environment held by BCC and State Agencies. A revised report will be provided when these reports are released.

The lack of information, both site and desktop does not permit adequate evaluation using the Common Nature Conservation Classification System although cross-referenced elsewhere. Further stages on the evaluation of the flora and fauna should access the above information, have field reports undertaken and use the CNCCS. This is not the definitive report of environmental planning instruments and supporting and other planning documents warranted for the Master Plan and L.A.P.

 

Thanks go to John Evans of SCRUB and B4C for assistance, research and persistent field work.

 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This area has highly significant State and Regional values, which require immediate protection from unsustainable development of primary landscapes of high scenic and aesthetic features, fertile red soils with mixed range of agriculture. The Rochedale plateau within the Local Area Plan constitutes an important water catchment boundary dividing Bulimba Creek ecosystems and tributaries to the west and the Leslie Harrison Dam catchment including Priest Gully and creek ecosystems to the east.

The interesting landforms, landscapes and geological features are not well recognised, acknowledged or protected by ecological instruments, except some Vegetation Protection Orders on the western perimeter to the north and in the Local Area Plan. Significant cultural and indigenous knowledge and utilisation of sites and resources are largely unknown, and even worse completely ignored.

Due to the high levels of development pressures within the immediate region, as evidenced by recent aerial photographs of adjoining suburbs of Springwood, Mt Petrie Wishart, Underwood and Rochedale South, it is very evident that all remaining vegetation and their ecosystems are essential for any viable fauna utilisation and survival.

This is particularly relevant for the koala, which requires large areas of contiguous forest for its long-term survival. This recognition was initiated by Brisbane City Council Green Space acquisition program of some of the adjoining forests, but never fulfilled. These forests within Brisbane and Redland Shire, combined with southern forests in East Logan City comprise State Significant Biodiversity (SEQ Regional Nature Conservation Strategy B.P.A. v 3.3) and significant habitat for the conservation protection of the koala.

Failure to provide or retain sufficient forest and koala habitat and obtain traffic / fauna separation for all upgrade roads in the precinct, Mt Gravatt-Capalaba Road, M1 and the Gateway Arterial will trigger further decline in the local and regional population.

It is therefore important to retain remnant vegetation and rural openspace within the proposed village, to enable critical Landbridge linkages to Bulimba Creek, for regional and for local fauna purposes.

It is pertinent and essential to maintain and retain, and enhance or acquire additional land or remnant forests as viable corridor linkages to enable dispersal to remnant bushland, and thereby maintain a viable gene pool.

While negative changes to permanent water availability exist it is possible to easily remove some sedimentation and weed levels to ameliorate impacted waterholes. Most marsupial food sources exist but extent and thresholds beyond several species are unknown. On available evidence the Grieve Road landfill perimeters and School Road East appear to have the most biodiversity potential.

Remaining mature trees are critical to fauna breeding and roosting through a wide range of available hollows in branches and trunks, that are utilised by owls, kingfishers, rainbow bee-eaters, dollar birds, parrots, possums, 3 species of gliders, insectivorous bats and native bees. Because of the unsustainable post-war loss of old growth trees, mitigating measures of placement of possum, bird, bat and bee boxes is virtually mandatory

The ridgelines, plateau and catchment boundaries also provide critical ecological linkages from lowland to upper areas through to the next set of ecosystems, and ease of faunal movement. In particular the utilisation of drainage lines, sheltered gullies and vegetated changes in topography are requirements of koalas, wallabies, possum and gliders.

 


Figure One Overview of the Study Area

Rochedale overview map

 

 

Ecological Overview of the proposed Rochedale Urban Village Area

This report has been prepared without access to major and subsidiary ecological reports, Corridor Studies and vegetation mapping instructed by Brisbane City Council. The extent of biodiversity is not known, effectively hampering this report and community input.

This area has critical State and Regional ecological significance due to several factors —

The Rochedale plateau, incorporated within the Local Area Plan, constitutes an important water catchment area and catchment boundary between Bulimba Creek ecosystems and tributaries to the west and the Leslie Harrison Dam catchment including Priest Gully and creek ecosystems to the east.

The interesting landforms, landscapes and geological features are not well recognised, acknowledged or protected by ecological instruments, except some Vegetation Protection Orders on the western perimeter to the north and in the Local Area Plan.

Significant cultural and indigenous knowledge and utilisation of sites and resources are largely unknown, and even worse completely ignored.

The combined remnant forests of southern Brisbane, Redlands, and Logan City have biodiversity values of State Significance (SEQ Regional Nature Conservation Strategy B.P.A. v3.3), including primary habitat for the conservation protection of the koala under S.P.P. 1/97. It is therefore important to retain remnant vegetation and rural openspace within the proposed development, which provides critical linkages to Bulimba Creek and the Koala Coast.

Discreet positions give high plateau views within the proposed urban village to Stradbroke Island in Moreton Bay, Mt Petrie and Mt Cotton, Mt Tamborine and Flinders Peak group, with the Main Range obscured by Kuraby and Sunnybank ridgeline.

For this reason, the Rochedale plateau is culturally significant because of its location, with site marking by landform and mountains in the landscape to guide travelling from range country to the coastal regions. The very fertile red soils and abundant water resources would provide a wide variety of resources for indigenous people in the region, which is best explained by traditional knowledge holder Shane Coghill.

Some ridgelines, plateau and catchment boundaries also provide critical ecological linkages from lowland to upper areas through to the next set of ecosystems, exhibiting ease of faunal movement. This area is a component of the critical ecological corridor from Flinders Peak to Moreton Bay.

 


Traditional Knowledge Holder Cultural Heritage/Cultural Resource preliminary assessment - Shane Coghill

Cultural Resources identified

Aesthetic Evidence

There are three (3) separate Traditional Owner groups that share this area. Mountains and creeks are the acknowledged and recognised and shared boundaries between Traditional Owner Groups. The high places have known stories where Ancestral Spirit Beings frequented in their travels of creation. This is undoubtedly the habitat of numerous plants and animals that make up the totemic belief system of the Traditional Owners of this area

Predicted Evidence

Considering the facts — freshwater and Bunya Nut Trees — food and water. There

are no doubts that there is other archaeological evidence

Recommendations

That the following cultural surveys are undertaken -

A full and comprehensive Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Holder Environmental Impact Survey

A full and comprehensive Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Holder Cultural Heritage/Cultural Resource Management Study

A full and comprehensive Indigenous Traditional Knowledge Holder Environmental Management Plan.

Now being informed that there are interested parties with Cultural Heritage values, people cannot plead ignorance. There are sites of significance in this area and their destruction will incur an approximate $750,000 fine. It would be in the best interests of all to undertake these recommendations.


Soil and Geology Summary

As outlined, the landforms now evident were derived from old land system formations through a series of geological events over millions of years, including several ice ages, changes in sea level and landscape alterations, through faulting and deposition of sandy materials infilling a large basin surrounded by older rocks. These have produced the present red earths, which are described as Sunnybank Formation (Tertiary red earths on higher elevated land). Some of the surrounding areas with red earths include Sunnybank, Eight Mile Plains, Kuraby, Mt Gravatt, Tarragindi, Mt Petrie and Mt Cotton.

Five distinctive and different soil types are present within the area based upon the map and soil descriptions in ‘Soil Landscapes of Brisbane and Environs’ by Beckmann et al

Sunnybank Formation (Tertiary red earths on higher elevated land) Rochedale plateau of red soils featuring the farming and agriculture areas

Woogaroo Subgroup (Triassic and Jurassic), which is comprised of quartzose sandstone, siltstone, shale and conglomerate mostly in lower lands,

Tingalpa formation (Triassic), underlying dominant sub-strata geology,

Corinda formation (Tertiary and some Quarternary); and small areas of

Eight Mile Plains basalt (Tertiary)

Because of the underlying influences of old sandstone geological formations, these red earths act as perched aquifers and drainage systems, often with springs, soaks and small tributaries within the current proposed urban village. At present, despite the number of discreet catchment areas that were observed during field reconnaissance, they are poorly represented on most maps.

Identification of hydraulic functions and relationships of these soils, surface waters and at least 3 aquifers is poorly modelled and documented. This warrants early intervention and immediate rectification.

An interesting geological feature worthy of ecological investigation and subsequent protection is the Gully. This deep fissure has produced a 12 metre deep gully, which is clearly highlighted on aerial photographs — refer to map, indicated by remnant vegetation, is situated adjacent to Rochedale Road and south of Farley Road.

Unfortunately, such a precious ecological resource is far from its original condition as a direct result of undue water use, by pumping, irrigation etc. The water availability and highly fertile deep red earths has resulted in cleared land for range of agricultural, horticultural practices and ancillary uses.

Remaining remnant vegetation, generally on different soils also indicates higher moisture levels, including tallow wood, forest red gum, brush box, some rainforest associations and paperbarks.

Summary of Vegetation Alliances and Regional Ecosystems

Field reconnaissance, walking transects, examination of major tributary and creek systems, alterations and changes in soils and geology, aspect, slopes and terrain variation revealed the diversity of vegetation types. As with regional ecosystems, any remnant vegetation occurring on deep red earths is a valuable ecological asset and not well preserved in other areas.

This diversity favours a range of fauna utilisation because of the provision of fertile soils, available water, high moisture levels and healthy plants, which includes koala food resources from tallowwood, grey gum, stringybarks and paperbark, depending upon seasonal influences. It is also relevant to conclude that fauna utilisation is dependant upon edaphic factors of larger remnant forests, clumps of vegetation, intact riparian vegetation along all drainage lines, and any connecting vegetation to adjoining large remnant forest ecosystems such as Brisbane Koala Bushlands (BKB).

These remnant forests include Brisbane City and Redland Shire, combined with southern forests in East Logan comprise significant koala habitat with second highest diversity of eucalypts in Eastern Australia, protected under State Planning Policy 1/97. It is therefore important to retain remnant vegetation and rural openspace within the proposed village, which has several opportunities for land and remnant forest critical linkages to Bulimba Creek and the Koala Coast.

The forest ecosystems include paperbark forests, mixed eucalypt forest of tallow wood, bloodwood, brush box, stringybarks and scribbly gum open forest with lower forests, the regrowth and regenerating forest as a result of past disturbances. These events include inappropriate over-exploitation of water resources, with a negative consequence upon water tables, aquifers and the critical functionality of aquatic ecological processes.

The amount of clearing of vegetation for farming, agriculture and horticulture has reduced some of the forest ecosystems to both the endangered and of concern category. This new status should ensure their preservation and enhancement is guaranteed in order to maintain the threshold. However the 30 percent threshold retention is argued by many scientists to be still insufficient. The scribbly gum forests are particularly important because of their threatened status, but especially because mature trees are critical for fauna breeding sites in branch and trunk hollows.


Status report on Major Ecological Links And Landbridges

The waterways and wetlands form a major component of the ecological links and are largely unnamed. Some waterways are not declared but must be recognised for sedimentation, silt loads and other functions, such as the Austral Bricks creek, which has the largest catchment. Many creeks remain dry because of: loss of springs, pumping, sedimentation and dams. Most creeks do not have riparian cadastral boundaries and some should be surveyed out and be dedicated to the Crown. All have a variable weed content and need rehabilitation.

The north-south and east-west vegetation corridors are largely framed by the VPOs and existing bushland. Other Regional linkages in the vicinity of Priestdale Road west, and Prebble Street and Subregional links near Gardner Road and the Gully catchment, to Farley Street potentially exist but have been eroded partly by clearing and land use change.

Connectivity to other Regional Bushland on Bulimba Creek and the Priest Gully Catchment requires more complex innovations, several acquisitions, agreements and revegetation programs.

All ecological land bridges may be further jeopardised by new road upgrades, shopping centres, infrastructure, land use change, lot layout contracts and intrusive as of right land uses.

The rural lands in the study area provide a unique opportunity to retain rural lands in the urban context. These rural open spaces provide opportunity for fauna movement that is of higher quality than that provided by urban areas. With appropriate revegetation and mechanisms to resist rating pressures these rural lands could be retained in perpetuity.

Threatening Processes

The example of development pressure such as exhibited by current proposal indicates that consideration and implementation of politically smart and new land planning is urgently required to offset the impacts of the nationwide land boom.

The insatiable market appetite to constantly develop and urbanise in land grabs, by suburb or L.A.P, which constitute whole landscape losses are generated by the Development Industry and Local Authorities and facilitated by state and Local Authorities. Examples of other pressure on landscape include

It is therefore important to retain remnant vegetation and rural openspace within the proposed village, to enable critical Landbridge linkages to Bulimba Creek, for regional and for local fauna purposes.

It is pertinent and essential to maintain and retain, and enhance or acquire additional land or remnant forests as viable corridor linkages to enable dispersal to remnant bushland, and thereby maintain a viable gene pool.

Failure to provide or retain sufficient forest and koala habitat and obtain traffic /fauna separation for all upgrade roads in the precinct, Mt Gravatt-Capalaba Road, M1 and the Gateway Arterial will trigger further decline in the local and regional population.

It is difficult to see how the proposed Rochedale masterplan will not adversely impact upon the tributaries and catchment values of creek systems within both catchments, including increased sedimentation, accelerated water runoff through hard surfaces including road networks, kerb and channelling, stormwater drains and from roofing.


Figure Two - Map of Identified Landbridges and Corridors in the Rochedale Study Area

Rochedale Ecological Corridors Map

Ecological Protection Recommendations

Maintaining Rural openspace and good quality agricultural land

That areas be set aside as rural openspace with a restriction on urbanisation or any intensification of current or future uses. In some areas this can be ensured by offering a range incentives in return for covenants on title. Strategic revegetation of these areas is a priority. The protection of these areas will contribute to ecological linkages, water quality protection and will allow residents to enjoy the benefits of local sustainable agriculture and the rural vistas.

A Corridor Plan

A detailed corridor plan needs to be developed which incorporates road crossing recommendations and rehabilitation priorities

This plan will incorporate linkages to adjoining natural area corridors and ecological footprints utilising remnant vegetation and the City-wide plan. The coridor plan should aim to link remant vegeation with the Belmot Hills to Crabrook bioregion corridor to the east and to the Bulimba creek corridor to the west.

The combined remnant forests of southern Brisbane, Redlands, and Logan City have biodiversity values of State significance (SEQ Regional Nature Conservation Strategy B.P.A. v3.3), including primary habitat for the conservation protection of the koala under S.P.P. 1/97 and the draft State Koala Conservation plan.

There is an urgent need for better recognition of the koala that reflects its changed status in SEQ to Regionally Vulnerable (NCA), which is far from evident in the current development proposal, such as removing the majority of vegetation, inadequate waterway corridor width, no overland linkage and no provision for seasonal movement patterns east-west (Koala bushland to Bulimba Creek).

Waterways and Water Resources

Many waterways have suffered from over clearing and require a range of rehabilitation techniques to improve connections to remnant riparian vegetation along Bulimba Creek and a mosaic across the proposed development area refer to attached aerial photograph of remnant vegetation for confirmation.

As mentioned previously, the undulating plateau contains an extensive recharge area and a critical component of the inter-catchment boundary with Leslie Harrison Dam and "Koala Coast". The attached waterways map clearly highlights the number of creeks, springs and tributary ecosystems into Bulimba Creek with obvious areas of modification, and also providing a major framework for the recommended ecological corridors.

Waterways designation is urgently needed over all the creeks and tributaries. The beds, banks and riparian zones should be transferred to BCC, particularly at Austral Bricks (in order to monitor the creek etc.).

Reduction of water use and restoration of environmental flows should be a priority environmental target.

The initiatives to replant the gaps in corridors, enhance the waterways and revitalise ecological processes will help maintain the regional and local Nature Conservation Values. The framework of ecological linkages for Rochedale is a latticework of some cardinal land bridges and some intersecting flowing, ephemeral and dry creeks.

Fauna Crossings

Any upgrade of development in this area of predominant agriculture and open space acreage needs to be supported by adequate and appropriate fauna crossings of road networks to facilitate fauna movement and survival. These are closely aligned with the land bridges identified and remnant forests and bushland on private property, as noted on aerial photograph, because they provide the most effective fauna linkage and shelter. These crossings are an integral component linking remnants as a series of ecological steppingstones through strategic rehabilitation and revegetation techniques to re-establish better habitat for koalas, gliders, possums and diverse range of fauna.

The rural openspace in the area provides many fauna crossing opportunities, particularly at night, and with strategic revegeation these areas could contribute even more. The retention of strategically revegetated rural openspace is an important part of the ecological corridors and linkages of the area.

Major Fauna crossings have been identified from the three described areas to ensure maximum potential for movement facilitation from northern, middle and southern areas, and include north-south linkage (Gateway North South Corridor linkages along Bulimba Creek - EC1)

Other Fauna crossings have been identified on Rochedale/Grieve Rds and on Gardner Rd.

Rehabilitation Potential

It is recommended that remnant vegetation and rural openspace within the proposed development be retained and rehabilitated ecological corridors with vegetation to provide critical linkages to Bulimba Creek and the Koala Coast.

It is pertinent and essential to acquire additional land or remnant forests as viable corridor linkages to enable dispersal to remnant bushland, and retain, maintain and enhance to maintain a viable gene pool.

The first priority for rehabilitation is Priestdale Road environs EC2 and the Miles Platting Road Creek as far as the Gateway Arterial as part of the EC1.

The second rehabilitation priority is the Prebble Street precinct EC4 requiring agreements, acquisitions and substantial revegetation. Subsequent priorities lie within EC1 for two creeks and revegetation of gaps.

Because of the unsustainable post-war loss of old growth trees, mitigating measures of placement of possum, bird, bat and bee boxes is virtually mandatory.

There should also be consideration by large "key" stakeholders within the Master plan Area to enlist for an Ecological Initiative. This initiative could include assistance with acquisition, ecological protection and rehabilitation of remnant forest, land bridges, revegetation of drainage lines and watercourses.

Ecological Linkages (see Figure Two)

There are many identified areas for effective linkage and increased ecological values that integrate waterways, ridgelines, plateau to other catchments from lowland to upper ecosystems, and facilitate faunal movement and shelter. This will have particular relevance for koalas, wallabies, possum, gliders, diverse reptiles and other mammals, provided they are 200 metres or more in width (Catterall), and not reverted to park or open space multiple use areas, regional parks or Greenways (bikeways).

It is also necessary to revegetate fragmented bushland along landbridges, creeks and drainage lines to improve the vegetation buffer and provide effective and sustainable weed management strategies. This will thereby provide replacement habitat for landscapes, which have recently been cleared, overfired and destroyed. Ecological linkages should also include an appropriate buffer zone at the edge of the Leslie Harrison Dam catchment.

The maintenance of of rural openspaces is also an important part of the ecological linkages. By retaining and improving rural openspace in the study areas the ecological functions, amenity values and protection of good quality agricultural land will enhanced and maintained.

Six land bridges and major corridors have been identified and a lesser number of smaller corridors

Ecological Corridors

EC1 North South - On eastern side of the study area Prebble St to Underwood Rd

EC2 East West - Between Priestdale and Miles Platting road

EC3 East West - Bulimba Creek to Grieve Rd

EC4 East West — Bulimba Ck to Preeble St to Farley St

EC5 Under M1 freeway

EC6 Under Gateway freeway

Three rural open space corridors have been identified to provide linkage between Bulimba creek and the Koala Coast Buslands to the east.

Sustainable Rural Corridors

SR1 East West — Gardner Rd to Rochedale Rd north of Ford Rd alignment

SR2 East West — Gardner Rd to Rochedale Rd south of Ford Rd alignment

SR3 North South — Ford Rd to Cnr Priestdale & Rochedale Rd

Eight waterways corridors were identified in the study area

Bulimba Creek

Grieve Rd Creek and three tributries

Central Creek and tributary

Underwood Rd Creek


 

Appendix 1 - Results of Preliminary Field Surveys of Major Landbridges, Waterways and Wetlands

Prebble Street EC4

This corridor has been mentioned in the Rochedale Technical and Ecotone reports

There is a critically urgent opportunity at Prebble Street to provide a regenerated flora link for fauna to a large area of Old Growth Forest and Regional Bushland on Bulimba Creek.

In order to limit traffic, and utilise existing vegetation where possible, it is proposed to -

Maintain conservation values and enhanced ecological corridors and expanded underpass needs to be initially agreed on.

Replant and retrofit/rebridge the unused Gateway underpass next to the road formation (similar bridging to Illaweena Lagoons Logan Motorway). Replant the Gateway Corridor land on the north side of Prebble St.

Acquire freehold, obtain the Mining Lease on the north western side (VPO) and replant a hundred metre wide plus strip and seek with consultation, partial road closure

Excise a vegetated strip from the Austral Bricks Mining Lease on the east, and newly acquired BCC freehold

Provide a linkage to the north-south landbridge (EC1) across Prebble Street.

The Prebble Street exercise is a high profile win-win number two priority.

The grounds are that -

Previous recommendations exist, and the underpass precedent exists at Karawatha

The most feasible ecological link to Bulimba Creek outside of a multi-million dollar fauna overpass over the M1 near School Road (EC5) or the northern end of the Mining Lease.

This particular site has the opportunity of natural grade and endemic rehabilitation

Gateway Arterial Area

Existing wetcell underpasses under the Gateway Arterial appear to be used by feral predators and some local fauna Initiatives of air and light cells and one metre wide fauna runways on the outside culverts are needed above local the uniform concrete culvert inverts. The arterial boundaries will need fauna fencing and revegetation, sophisticated feral removals and earthworks. Some of these wingwalls with adjoining wet reed beds and mud present a formidable barrier for most fauna. Main Roads require further investigation and fauna surveys, which the community cannot afford. A drycell about 3m x 4m above flood level on the EC1 is required.

About 5 double retrofitted wet cell underpasses (existing) will be needed under the Gateway Arterial.

Fauna proof fencing is required on both sides of the Gateway Arterial (the highest koala killing road of the 1990’s) to prevent the further unsustainable fauna road kills.

Riparian Creeks, springs and drainage lines within urban proposal

Underwood Road Creek

This creek enters Brisbane City under a Rochedale Road Service Station. This has rock-clad exit and a deep pool, which requires special engineering works for silt removal etc from Rochedale South urban runoff. The melaleucas downstream appear to be surviving, but it is not known the extent of urban impacts as far as School Road. Culling of exotic pine, and remedial rehabilitation to reduce weed infestation would provide valuable habitat for ecological linkages along creek. The unnamed School Road Creeks appear to be a mixture of drains and local creeks, on the western side of School Road, one through the Chinese Church grounds. These require mapping and classification.

Siting of a possible fauna overpass is warranted here. EC5 Bulimba Creek Koalas need access and protection at the M1 near the busway station.

Miles Platting Road Creek (Part of EC1)

This rises in bushland and farmland north of Priestdale Road and runs northwest on southern Miles Platting Road to west of Gardner Road/Miles Platting Road intersection inside freehold for about one hundred metres before it crosses the road. This part of the creek area is heavily infested with Madeira vine, camphor laurel and other weeds, while the vine is killing melaleucas and putting at risk rainforest trees. This area and a major part of the creek is VPO, which has high ecological value and warrants immediate restoration. This area needs an urgent upgrade under the raos to proivide access for fauna and facilitation of movement.

It is highly visible, and receiving adverse comments from landholders and the ecosystem contributes to a range of ecological processes. This is a signature entry Site for Rochedale Village. This creek and environs is priority one action area - Miles Platting Road

Miles Platting Road Creek North (Part of EC1)

This creek runs NNW and comprises a lagoon with native ducks and other fauna and is a key waterway linkage to remnant bushland 200 metres north and requires a wide area of replanting over an area, previously a wetland and riparian zone on the left bank. This has been overfired and possibly illegally filled. The right bank has macadamias planted and eucalypts inside the waterways zone. This area may warrant negotiated transfers to Council and fill removal, before replanting can proceed. Much of this lower catchment supports Eucalyptus racemosa (Endangered Regional Ecosystem) and Nerang Beenleigh Alliances. It does however require downstream weed removal, partial acquisitions or agreements inside and outside V.P.O’s, fill removal and extensive replanting.

This is a priority one and signature area, which can proceed in stages. It features a high including range of ecological processes and aquatic habitats, but linkage to koala habitat and VPO areas is needed. Old VPOs exist over some of the area.

Gardner Road Creek (part of EC1)

The north arm of this creek at No. 301(?) has weeds in the bed of the creek, from about 200 metres west of Gardner Road. From Gardner Road to the Gateway, It has a catchment structure of melaleuca, casuarinas, bloodwood and scribbly gum. The northern catchment appears devoid of a large number of eucalypt species seen in the southern catchment.

Sandstone bedrock and sandy catchment wallum heath species exist. Such species as wild may, and banksias are noted in nearby sandy areas.

Information from local representative Tom Cooper indicates large silt loads have come down this creek from farmlands in maximum rainfall events. This accounts for the sedimentation, the infestation of bamboo grass and lantana etc for most of the creek, which is rectifiable. Soil conservation measures are needed at Gardner road.

Water quality appears good with several pools and evidence of crayfish in a waterhole upstream of the junction. Downstream of the junction the riparian zone has weed distributed in layers for about fifty metres in width with wild tobacco, lantana, devils fig, bamboo grass, etc The creek is flowing at the Gateway, probably because of springs and the southern arm from Miles Platting Road

More challenges exist to link Prebble Street East with Gardner Road East Bushlands, through Austral Bricks, and perhaps adjoining freehold with broadhectare revegetation.

Gardner Road Creek 2

The second creek on Gardner Road opposite 266 requires rehabilitation. This appears to flow into Kyeema Street. The Kyeema St creek has drums and tanks, and a variety of weeds. It features old melaleucas and eucalypts near Kyeema Street in the riparian zone but is largely cleared upstream. This was previously prosecuted for illegal clearing and verification of fines for rehabilitation is warranted. The downstream silting is apparent as a result of unfortunate catchment management practices, and water quality should be checked. It appears to be near the dump buffer zone. It needs attention for unpredictable overland flow and upstream problems of erosion, potential eutrophication and drastically changed ecosystems.

This is a priority four area, which should be subject to the Water E.P.P.

Austral Bricks Creek

The creek from the dump, although very turbid holds frogs at this time, but as it goes through Austral Bricks, large bund walls appear to support the creek. Some parts of the bund are clad with holey bricks. The extent of this structure may cover 50% of the watercourse.

The ability to do much here depends on the DNR and EPA permits, extractive lease permits, the EMOS conditions and ability to import soil which will be a problem with fire ants. Further investigation is needed on total site.

A waterways designation is needed at Austral Bricks in order to monitor and control silt loads, depositions of unknown leachates, water quality and future flood peaks; The activities here are not best practice and titling and EMOS requirements and retiring the Mining Lease should fund major rehabilitation and transfer to B.C.C. and DNR jurisdiction.

Kyeema Street creek enters the Mining Lease from Prebble Street and appears to retain a waterways riparian zone for several hundred metres.

Other creeks in the brickworks are constrained by the industry activities.

The several creek underpasses to Bulimba Creek remain to be checked west of the Grieve Road V.P.O.s and elsewhere in Austral Bricks bushlands.

Grieve Road Creeks (part of EC3)

This is possibly the longest creek within the precinct. The Grieve Road Creek starts near Ford Road with some documented tributaries

A high voltage powerlines straddles the east west section of the creek westerly as far as the dump and Gardner Road. This is a relevant conservation linkage at Rochedale Road. The creek mainly features long grass, which can be replanted with small native species. The Old Growth trees and VPO bushland are major habitat and a koala linkage to the Leslie Harrison Dam and are critical to the Rochedale landbridges.

The Gully Area

This 12 metre deep fissure is located in a red soil gully, as clearly highlighted on aerial photograph, in conjunction with geology map, indicating a long established creek with cultural values. It resembles Spring Creek running out of Belmont Hills, but is deeper, wider and longer. It is at the end of a constructed drain from Rochedale Road and due to seasonal variation, or from overuse of underground water resources, is currently dry. It does not appear to be a waterway under aspects of the Water Act, as it only has right line boundaries but has some designation under the waterways code.

There is some farm rubbish in the gully, which is treed on the edges and gully slopes. It is not known whether all the native species are endemic, but this is largely irrelevant. It presents an unusual bird habitat. It warrants erosion measures, weed and camphor laurel eradication and buffer zone planting subject to consultation. This warrants further assessment as far as Farley Street.

Other bushland and creeks east of Gardner Road exhibit climax forest

These Gully creeks warrant detailed work for flora, fauna and limnology

The Western half of Farley Street is un-constructed with bushland and some adjoining sloping bushland. This has some weed and camphor laurel but has good forest structure and should be retained The Dump E.I.S, warrants re examination.

Dump Buffer zone

North of Farley Street is the dump southern buffer zone, which has a VPO. It exhibits several layers of weeds to tree height: Chinese Elm, Camphor laurel, umbrella tree, Ochna, Pepper Tree, Privet, with climbing Madeira vine down to the creek. The area is well utilised by koalas at the western end with koala poles on the fence. Weed removal would allow the regeneration of this area for a range of flora and enhanced ecological processes. The original Dump EIS indicated very high Biodiversity for this site

The magnitude and variety of this weed source makes Farley Street a priority five destination for weed eradication/replanting teams.

The North South Corridor (EC1)

This is viewed as the fundamental Regional Linkage in Rochedale, linking Priestdale Road to Prebble Street

The large bushland on the S.E corner at the intersection of School Road and Priestdale Road has a large eucalypt content and a V.P.O. However the street perimeters have slash pine and a band of burnt out casuarinas and wattles. This is a release point for rehabilitated koalas and a key parcel in regional corridors.

The Creek requires further Assessment.

The Strawberry farm on the N.E Corner of School Road and Priestdale Road. This should be purchased and replanted.

No 34 School road has about 75 metres of pine planted. Some agreement should be sought to remove these trees and replant with eucalypts.

No 32 is a vacant bushland lot with a tall stand of regrowth forest, melaleuca and bloodwoods. Weed infestation: Chinese Elm. Asparagus fern, catsclaw, ochna, lantana. This requires weed removal and enrichment planting

No 30 is fenced but has a large climax eucalypt forest behind the house. Peripheral inspection indicates very high quality bushland V.P.O. A Special agreement needed.

No 18 has a large amount of climax bush behind. V.P.O.A Special Agreement needed.

No 14 has a shack. The rear vegetation requires assessment but needs quarantining from Medium Rise Development

No 10 has thin bushland at the rear. This needs enrichment planting and widening of the corridor. The cadastre and continuity of bushland here depends on other blocks fronting Miles Platting Road V.P.O.

The bushland and environs on School Road East need quarantining from Residential A, medium/high rise development and small lot development.

The State Planning Policy SPP 1/97 and E.P.A. Biodiversity Planning Assessment V 3. 3 require amendment over this precinct

The bushland as far as the Gardner Road Creek 1 has been discussed above

From that creek north on the L shaped lot, the next parcel ("the quarantine block") has been cleared, some of it Endangered Regional Ecosystem This has occurred in the past 6 years. It is essential that the rear of this lot be examined for existing seedbanks and urgently revegetated to provide flora and fauna linkages

The position for a dry cell underpass (EC6) under the Gateway is warranted in this vicinity (the quarantine block) given the prevalence and success of those in Northern NSW. The next parcels north apparently under lease, front Kyeema Street and Prebble Street and in line with the Technical Report require broad hectare rehabilitation, for a Gateway Buffer and the landbridge

This is a priority three action and ties in with the Prebble Street West Program (Priority two) and Kyeema Street Creek (priority five)

Priestdale Road East West Corridor (EC2)

Old land uses, new subdivision and increased road usage have increased Koala mortality in this area

Because of the potential to reinstate the area as a regional conservation corridor, the given Institutional uses and existing high profile residential acreage residential development it should be given priority one and designated Special Management Area.

The flora and koala habitat on School Road represents some of the best in the total area. Continuous planting is needed in the Central Section of the EC2 area preferably behind the high profile residences on the north side of Priestdale road

This is a priority one category because of its strategic regional importance

Linking to areas of state biodiversity importance

Grieve Road Special Investigation Area (EC3)

The Planning Scheme has been defended in this area at Grieve Road west in Court several times (decision by Robin J. circa 2002). Prosecution for tree clearing may have been initiated. The area east of Gardner Road remains in the Koala Coast "primary zone" under S.P.P. 1/97 This information is not reflected in reports, maps or process. About seven parcels on the southern side of Grieve Road are not V.P.O., near Mt Gravatt Capalaba Road.

The scoping brief and Terms of Reference for the special investigation are not available. Further the brief for the Investigation has not been tabled. This is needed

The Rochedale Draft Master plan documents have misreported that the EPA regards this area as being not important for Koalas. This statement has not been justified or tabled, and the Ecotone Report has therefore incorrectly downgraded parts of Grieve Road west. This situation is outrageous and many expert groups and the Koala and Wildlife Rescue Organisations refute the claims and assert that this area is very important for Koalas.

Any attempt to reduce V.P.O coverage and make decisions contrary to the SPP 1/97 and Guidelines, or set up code assessment or self assessment attacks the credibility of the Local Assets Law (vegetation) and the State Planning Policy 1/97 for the Koala Coast , State Koala Conservation Plan (In preparation).

Upgrading of Grieve Road traffic has accelerated impacts on Fauna Populations.

B.R.E.C. has advised Main Roads to Koala proof fence the Gateway Arterial to stop the high intensity of koala road kills.

A shopping centre appears to be proceeding in this area out of step with the Village Masterplan.

The Special Investigation Area should be withdrawn