BRISBANE REGION ENVIRONMENT COUNCIL


Recovery Plan for White’s Hill/Pine Mt Reserve

 

Prepared By the Whites Hill Pine Mtn Reference Group

Brisbane Region Environment Council, Whites Hill Pine Mtn Community Group,

S.C.R.U.B, Qld Naturalists, B.R.A.I.N.,Friends of Olivia Park

principal authors D. Gasteen, M.Petter

 


Contents


Summary of Ecological Protection Recommendations

Until we can regain some of the intimate knowledge about small scale mosaic burning techniques we should desist from controlled burns in the reserve and allow manual fuel reduction other fire prevention and fire constraint techniques to be trialled for 5-7 years. This will help to control the intensity and extent of both wildfires and deliberately lit fires and facilitate the regeneration and restoration of rainforest areas.

There should be two sorts of tracks within the reserve, main tracks and local tracks. There should be three advertised main tracks

• Unsealed track from Jones Rd to the Sporting reserve. (Main Track)

• Unsealed track from Pine Mtn Rd. (Education Track)

• Sealed track from sporting reserve to summit of Whites Hill. (Summit Track)

There should be unadvertised local tracks from:

• Bendeena St to Pine Mtn, Main track and Education track

• Indus St to Whites Hill/Sankeys Mtn

• Reservoir to Carnelian St and Main track

• Gyandra St to Pine Mtn, Main track and Education track


MAP OF THE WHITES HILL/PINE MTN RESERVE showing the 13 Areas
Map Showing the 13 Areas

Area 1 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Access pathways: Major access comes from Jones Rd to sporting reserve crossing Areas 10, 8 and 3, a second connects Carnelian St to the sporting area, These two paths could be used by people to access the sporting reserve. A sealed BCC track starts on the north side of this area and leads into areas 12 and 11. The gazetted Sankeys Rd which starts in this area, and crosses the whole reserve, should be closed.

Riparian corridors: There are four distinctive riparian corridors, two from the western side, and two from Area 3. One joins remnant bush at the southern side of Whites Hill to regrowth along Salvins Ck at the southern edge of the sporting reserve. Another flows from Boundary Rd to Salvins Creek. There are then two spring fed tributaries from Area 3 that run across the emergency tip site and join Salvins Ck at the south end of the reserve.

There should be no authorised access of mountain bikes for any purposes in the conservation zone.

Pollution Monitoring and Control: The recent land fill sites on the south eastern corner of the sporting reserve will need ongoing monitoring for both methane and leachates. A sediment and pollution control structure should be constructed before run-off enters Salvin Ck. This could take the form of retention basins, gross pollutant traps and restored into a wetland system, through ponding and revegetation, including all riparian corridors.

Habitat Notes : Potential habitat linkage via riparian corridors, limited habitat value.

 

Area 2 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Access Notes : An access track to sporting reserve exists at the eastern end of this area. A gazetted portion of Pine Mtn Rd runs through this area, this road should be closed. We recommend a local track from Carnellian St to the reservior be maintained.

This area has had rehabilitation works in the past and is essential for catchment protection.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and weeds.

Habitat Notes : Important habitat values with linkages to Salvin Creek, dead trees, hollows, foliage and forage value from flowering trees. Suitable understorey habitats for fauna are also common in this area.

Area 3 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Narrowest part of conservation area must be protected from most uses and have an enhanced vegetation buffer with quarry.

Access Notes : The gazetted Sankeys Rd runs through this area and should be closed. Part of the Pine Mtn Rd unsealed access track and local track runs through the eastern edge of this area. The main unsealed access track from Jones Rd to Area 1 runs through the northern edge of this area.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : Gully and drain lines with permanent ponds provide habitat values, this area is important for ground fauna movement from Salvin Creek to Sankeys Mt. The area also contains a number of dead trees and suitable tree and log hollows for a range of fauna.

Area 4 Ecological Protection Recommendations

This area has significant riparian remnant rainforest, including.Cupaniopsis shirleyana and Macadamia integrifollia (listed as Vulnerable by DoE), and Restricted species Glochidion sumatranum and Gmelina leichardtii. This area must be enhanced to protect it from quarry activities. This area is already the target of some rehabilitation and interpretive access.

Access Notes : A section of of Pine Mtn road is gazetted through this area, this road should be closed. An existing unsealed access track runs from Pine Mtn Rd to Area 3.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced weeds and grasses.

Habitat Notes : Significant forage values for Koala and other arboreal mammals due to large numbers of Eucalyptus. tereticornis, E. microcorys, E propinqua, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Lophostemon confertus and L sauveolens. This area is structurally healthy and retains significant ground layer, understorey, mid layer and canopy habitats. The rainforest areas provide significant fruit resources for a range of fauna including wallaby, echidna, powerful owls, whip birds and rainbow bee-eaters.

Area 5 Ecological Protection Recommendations

30% to Conservation Zone balance earmarked for future restoration.

Habitat Notes : High vantage points with dead trees offers suitable roosting and hunting sites for raptors and powerful owls. This area is a valuable habitat and buffer zone for the northern boundary of the quarry.

Area 6 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Extremely significant remnant old growth values and species of regional significance.

Access Notes: An existing local track running from Bendeena St to the Mian Access track may need sone realignment and rehabilitation. This track should be rerouted along the ridge towrds Area 8 before joing a local track heading to Education track and the Main access track.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas mainly on the northern and eastern boundary of this area.

Habitat Notes : Significant old growth trees with branch hollows and dead limbs. High numbers of forage trees for a range of fauna. Rock outcrops provide suitable fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna. High vantage points with dead trees offers suitable roosting and hunting sites for raptors and powerful owls.

Area 7 Ecological Protection Recommendations

This area has Cupaniopsis shirleyana and Acacia perangusta , both plants are listed as Vulnerable by DoE.

Access Notes :Local track from Gyandra St to Main track via Pine Mtn ridge lines. Part of the gazetted Sankeys Rd pases through this rea, this road should be closed.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, Rehabilitation and revegetation along drain-lines and gullies. Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in revegetation projects and for habitat enhancement.

Habitat Notes : High conservation value from the physical features of deep gully, permanent waterholes and vulnerable rainforest species. This area provides grassland habitats and forage for some ground fauna. Rehabilitation would enhance habitat values in this area and aid species recovery. This area contains rocky outcrops which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna.

Area 8 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Flindersia australis regrowth and significant rock outcrops.

Access Notes : Part of the gazetted Sankeys Rd pases through this area, this road should be closed. A local track runs along the southern boundry of this area and the Main access track runs along its NW edge.

Fire Notes: Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : Open forest with diverse and dominant grass and herb ground layer providing important habitat for ground fauna. This area contains rocky outcrops which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna.

Area 9 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Highly significant Remnant Riparian Vine forest and rock outcrops

Access Notes: Close all existing tracks in this area.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion. Needs rehabilitation and revegetation. Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and weeds.

Habitat Notes : Significant fauna values with burrows, hollow logs, tree and branch hollows. The area has a dense ground layer of false bracken and regenerating lianas which provides habitat for a range of fauna. This area contains rocky outcrops which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna. There are a high numbers of forage trees for a range of fauna.

Area 10 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Melaleuca dominant forest on Sankey Ck

Access Notes: Part of the Main Tracks start in this area on its eastern border. Other tracks closed.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas. Fuel reduction should focus on boundaries with Jones Rd and Indus St.

Habitat Notes : Flowering Melaleuca and E. tereticornis provide excellent forage value for a range of fauna. Wallaby and other ground fauna habitat along drain lines with dense understorey.

Area 11 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Catchment protection and remnant forest values

Access Notes: A local track from Indus St should run along contours to Whites Hill and Sankey’s Mt.

Fire Notes: Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : High dominant ridge line has tall trees and standing dead trees providing tree and branch hollows for nesting sites, roosting and foraging opportunities for a range of avifauna. Open forest with diverse and dominant grass and herb ground layer providing important habitat for ground fauna including wallaby, echidna, bandicoot. and reptiles.

Area 12 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Catchment protection and remnant forest values

Low level recreation usage and buffer to sporting reserve

Access Notes: A sealed BCC track runs through this Area from Area 1 to a small circut around the summit of Whites Hill.

Fire Notes: Green fire breaks could be used to ‘fire proof’ this area. Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : High point and dominant ridge line provides roosting and hunting sites for a range of avifauna. This area contains rocky outcrops , and associated basket fern clumps, which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna.

Ecological Protection Recommendations: Links from the reserve

These links are vital for the remnant to fill its ecological role in the area. They should be protected by inclusion in the green space system, catchment plans, appropriate zoning, VPO’s and VCA’s. A number of bushcare groups exist along the links from the reserve such as the Olivia Drive group. These groups should continue to expand and contribute to the rehabilitation and management of linkages in cooperation with council and private landholders.

The main links are;

North West: to Boundary Rd and Norman Ck

North East : to Gyandra St and Bulimba Ck

East : to Salvins Ck to Bulimba Ck

South West: to Salvin Ck Catchment

South : to Boral Land Remnants and Salvins Ck see attatched linkage map

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Recovery Plan Introduction

This large forest reserve has many outstanding features, including mountain views, tall open eucalypt forest, spring-fed Salvin Creek and remnant riparian rainforest, with regionally significant flora and fauna species across a range of diverse habitats and ecosystems.

Unfortunately, due to a range of competing factors, the ecological integrity of the area has been challlenged by the impacts from Pine Mountain quarry, former land fill site and sporting area, which combined have allowed uncontrolled access by vehicles, trail bikes, other bikes and dogs due to inadequate fencing.

Reports by consultants nominated White’s Hill Reserve and particularly the quarry for further consideration as a mountain bike events course, apparently to offset housing development pressures and to avoid damage to Toohey Forest, Karawatha and western suburbs. It is essential to restrict mountain bike use to sporting reserve for recreation purposes and not for the use of staged events.

Ironically, by implication, calling this forest complex the White’s Hill Recreation Reserve, suggests an open space/park-land intent rather than highlighting the importance of the remnant forest as flora and fauna habitat. The White’s Hill Reserve has environmental significance and has important forest habitat values for fauna including gliders, possums, wallabies and koala, powerful owl and other birds, reptiles, aquatic fauna, marsupials and small mammals.

Currently there is a vegetation protection order covering remnant forest although the majority of the reserve is covered by 2 town plan zones, Open Space, and Sport and Recreation.

The White’s Hill Reserve is recognised as an environmentally significant area, but this will only be enhanced if there is a concerted effort by local planners to ensure security of tenure of corridors and buffers providing linkage to remnant bushland.

The adjoining eastern bushlands are an essential addition to the reserves core areas due to the old growth values and koala food tree species in abundance; as well as performing an important corridor function using creek lines and remnant urban bushland matrix to Bulimba Creek.

In order to protect sub-catchments and highly erodible soils with rocky screed slopes, ridge lines, steep gullies and drainage lines, there should be minimal access to all high vantage points using contour lines; and not via the current steep ascent created by trail bike and four wheel drive abuse.

Similarly, any future proposal to restore eroded and degraded areas are aimed at total track closure, with high vantage points being accessed from discreet side entry onto timber platforms to prevent further erosion and allow natural regeneration to occur.

There should be two sorts of tracks within the reserve, main tracks and local tracks. There should be three advertised main tracks

• Unsealed track from Jones Rd to the Sporting reserve. (Main Track)

• Unsealed track from Pine Mtn Rd (Education Track)

• Sealed track from sporting reserve to summit of Whites Hill( Summit Track)

There should be unadvertised local tracks from:

• Bendeena St to Pine Mtn, Main track and Education track

• Indus St to Whites Hill/Sankeys Mtn

• Reservoir to Carnelian St and Main track

• Gyandra St to Pine Mtn, Main track and Education track

 

Fire

The reserve currently suffers from an increased fuel load from introduced grasses (guinea grass and paspalum), which greatly increases fire intensity and frequency to yearly or twice yearly rather than for longer fire intervals.

This high frequency fire regime is detrimental to ground fauna habitats by reducing available shelter and breeding hollows, and affecting flora species diversity by promoting fire tolerant regrowth of wattles, she-oak, and open areas dominated by blady grass, bracken and native grasses.

As a consequence, many regenerating trees and shrubs are prevented from reaching maturity and are forced into a cycle of vegetative growth, with remnant and regenerating rainforest areas being most altered and reduced by fire intensity.

The traditional fire regime used by the indigenous people would have been focussed at keeping trails and living areas open and maintaining pastures for native herbivores. The burning would have been done by people with an intimate knowledge of the different land systems and local climate.

In the absence of what we would call fire fighting equipment the local people would have relied on small fires, natural fire breaks and the appropriate weather conditions to guard against catastrophic fire escapes.

The threat of fire to houses in proximity has to be acknowledged, but we believe that through rehabilitaion and fuel reduction measures, the local residents will have greater safety from fire. Existing controlled burns are a major contributor to local and regional air pollution. This air pollution leads to over 50 premature deaths per annum. The widespread burning regime selects for fire tolerant species and drier ecosystems which increase the likelihood of fire.

Until we can regain some of the intimate knowledge about small scale mosaic burning techniques we should desist from controlled burns in the reserve and allow manual fuel reduction other fire prevention and fire constraint techniques to be trialled for 5-7 years. This will help to control the intensity and extent of both wildfires and deliberately lit fires and facilitate the regeneration and restoration of rainforest areas.

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Physical Characteristics

This area has highest visual qualities from the Pine Mt ridge line and saddle, with western views to Mt Lindesay and Mt. Barney, Wilson’s Peak, Flinder’s Peak and Ivory Peak, Great Dividing Range to the north-west, and east to the Moreton Bay Islands; with an excellent overview of the extensive forest systems across the reserve to Sankey’s Mountain and White’s Hill.

The high ridges extending to Pine Mountain provide the catchment boundary of Sankey’s Creek and Salvin Creek, with rocky screed slopes and some very steep dissecting gullies, several permanent rock pools and ponds with seasonal flows. These gullies are highly prone to erosion from loose surface and shallow top soils exacerbated by inappropriate trail bike tracks.

The geology and rock types which comprise the highest ridges and mountains are described by Beckmann, Hubble and Thompson (The Soil Landscapes of Brisbane and South-eastern Environs) as "Metamorphosed sediments (greywacke, siltstone and shale), with some basic volcanic rocks and chert and jasper, of the Paleozoic Neranleigh-Fernvale Group extend south-easterly in a belt from West Chermside to the Holland Park-Mt Gravatt and Belmont-Mt Petrie areas, and are exposed again further south towards Mt Cotton." The authors call this theMt Cotton landscape (MC -lithosols, some red clays).

"This landscape includes the steep slopes and crests of moderately high hills of quartzite (60-230 m) at Mt Cotton, Pine Mountain, Mt Gravatt and Belmont. Schists and small areas of igneous rocks occur with the quartzite and there are areas of colluvium on the lower hill slopes. Podzolic-lithosols (Um2.12) with loamy textures and containing large pieces of quartzite are the dominant soils on the steep upper slopes. Red clay soils, some of which are associated with igneous rocks, also occur on the slopes, along with gravelly red podzolic soils (3.31). Red clay soils similar to red earths occur on colluvium."

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Significance of Vegetation: Rare, Threatened Conservation Status

Sankey’s Scrub has regional significance because of the presence of 3 species listed as Vulnerable, by Department of Environment these are: Cupaniopsis shirleyana, Acacia perangusta, and Macadamia integrifolia.

There were 10 species in the published list ‘Native plants subject to the Nature Conservation legislation’ 1995, including Banksia integrifolia, Exocarpos cupressiformis, Gleichenia dicarpa, Leptospermum polygalifolium, Platycerium bifurcatum, Platycerium superbum, Pultenaea villosa, Sticherus flabellatus, Xanthorrhoea latifolia, and Xanthorrhoea macronema (bottlebrush grass tree).

However, there were a further 13 species of biogeographical and regional importance because of their restricted distribution based on reports by Kordas and Thompson; these include plant communities of riparian rainforest, wetlands, and those with E. seeana and E. carnea.

 

These plant species includeEucalyptus henryi (large-leaved spotted gum), E. seeana (narrow-leaved red gum), E. siderophloia (grey ironbark), E. racemosa syn. signata (scribbly gum), Angophora woodsiana (smudgee), Gompholobium latifolium (glory bush-pea), Hakea florulenta (three-veined hakea), Persoonia cornifolia (broad-leaf geebung), Trachymene incisa (native yam), Pultenaea euchila (blue-leaf bush pea), Rhodomyrtus psidioides (native guava), Glochidion sumatranum (umbrella cheese tree), and slender vine Echinostephia aculeata (prickly tape vine).

Other species of regional significance and considered uncommon areGmelina leichardtii (white beech), Tricoryne anceps (flat-stemmed yellow rush lily), and dense understorey areas of Oxylobium aciculiferum (needle shaggy pea). with E. henryi as dominant upper canopy tree.

A more complete assessment of the significance and diversity of this reserve would have to consider the spring fed Salvin Creek which flows through rainforest at Sankey’s Scrub, and performs a functional important tributary of Bulimba Creek.

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Summary of Each Management Area


These 13 areas have been created to largely represent drainage catchment boundaries and ridge lines with the exception of the recreation and quarry areas: (see Map 1)


Area 1 The sporting reserve

Sport & Recreation, Open Space Zones


Physical features: This area is a modified landscape which formerly comprised of a eucalypt open forest complex, with four distinctive drainage lines, that passed through a spring-fed marsh and wetland system in the upper catchment of Salvin Creek. There is a portion of remaining open forest in the open space “common”, which provides an important linkage to forest reserve, as well as a valuable riparian and fauna habitat linkage to Salvin Creek.

Threats: Because this area acts as the buffer to the eucalypt open forest reserve, any incursions into this area should be restricted to disturbed and degraded areas adjacent to Boundary Road and north-western lower portion of White’s Hill. There should be controlled access using the forest main access track to Jones Road; and no authorised access for mountain bike use. As more people pressure is exerted upon the sporting area, the absence of fencing will increase likelihood of degradation from edge effects (weeds, fuel build up), erosion, rubbish dumping and increased feral and introduced animal use is placing undue pressure on native fauna populations and diversity.

Proposed Action: Fence the recreation area, include signage, interpretive and explanations of penalties for unauthorised use.

Area 1 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Access pathways: Major access comes from Jones Rd to sporting reserve crossing Areas 10, 8 and 3, a second connects Carnelian St to the sporting area, These two paths could be used by people to access the sporting reserve. A sealed BCC track starts on the north side of this area and leads into areas 12 and 11. The gazetted Sankeys Rd which starts in this area, and crosses the whole reserve, should be closed.

Riparian corridors: There are four distinctive riparian corridors, two from the western side, and two from Area 3. One joins remnant bush at the southern side of Whites Hill to regrowth along Salvins Ck at the southern edge of the sporting reserve. Another flows from Boundary Rd to Salvins Creek. There are then two spring fed tributaries from Area 3 that run across the emergency tip site and join Salvins Ck at the south end of the reserve.

There should be no authorised access of mountain bikes for any purposes in the conservation zone.

Pollution Monitoring and Control: The recent land fill sites on the south eastern corner of the sporting reserve will need ongoing monitoring for both methane and leachates. A sediment and pollution control structure should be constructed before run-off enters Salvin Ck. This could take the form of retention basins, gross pollutant traps and restored into a wetland system, through ponding and revegetation, including all riparian corridors.

Habitat Notes : Potential habitat linkage via riparian corridors, limited habitat value.

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Area 2 Reservoir to Carnelian Street

Conservation Zone


Physical features: This area has undulating low relief slopes and minor western catchment for Salvin Creek, with some areas of sheltered understorey, and several eroded former access tracks to the sporting fields and up to the reservoir, which clearly indicate the impacts from loss of vegetation, compaction and erosion processes exposing nutrient poor, shallow top soils and clay sub-soils.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: Eucalypt open forest that has been selectively cleared but south of reservoir has a healthy canopy and middle layer of wattles, eucalypts and casuarinas, and eastern portions with a poorly developed forest layer as a result of logging, fire frequency, degraded tracks, soil and nutrient loss and compaction from tracks. There is a sparse middle stratum of young eucalypts, acacia and casuarina regrowth, with understorey of kangaroo grass, wiry panic, wire grass, lomandra, saw-sedge, slender rice flower, guinea flower, trailing star flower and blueberry lilly.

Commonly occurring species include E. siderophloia (Queensland grey ironbark), E. trachyphloia (brown bloodwood), E. maculata (spotted gum), E. fibrosa (broad-leaved ironbark), E. resinifera (red mahogany), E. tindaliae syn. nigra, (Queensland white mahogany), E . umbra ssp. umbra, (broad-leaved white mahogany), E. carnea (white mahogany), E. seeana (narrow-leaved red gum), with Angophora leiocarpa (rusty gum) and occasional Angophora woodsiana (smudgee).

Threats: Because this area is an integral linkage to the eucalypt open forest reserve, any incursions into this area should be restricted to disturbed and degraded areas adjacent to Boundary Road including western lower portion of White’s Hill.

There should be controlled access through the forest to main access track to Jones Road; and no authorised use as access for mountain bikes. As more people pressure is exerted upon the sporting area, the absence of fencing will increase likelihood of degradation from edge effects (weeds, fuel build up), erosion, rubbish being dumped and increased feral/introduced animal use.

There have been efforts to restrict the number of access points from Carnelian Street to the reservoir and sporting reserve using drotts to place logs and rocks, as well as ripping disturbed areas prior to revegetation, including removal of car bodies, rubbish and weed control, direct seeding and brush matting.

Area 2 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Access Notes : An access track to sporting reserve exists at the eastern end of this area. A gazetted portion of Pine Mtn Rd runs through this area, this road should be closed. We recommend a local track from Carnellian St to the reservior be maintained.

This area has had rehabilitation works in the past and is essential for catchment protection.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and weeds.

Habitat Notes : Important habitat values with linkages to Salvin Creek, dead trees, hollows, foliage and forage value from flowering trees. Suitable understorey habitats for fauna are also common in this area.

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Area 3 Pine Mt., Eastern catchment of Salvin Creek to sporting reserves

Conservation Zone


Physical features: Steep ridge line and dissecting gullies which comprise the eastern catchment of Salvin Creek, with some areas of exposed rock on surface, and interesting rock pools and semi-permanent ponds. Both drain lines have a reduced opportunity to flow into Salvin Creek from dump site transformation including filling and rechannelling.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: These forests show obvious signs of clearing, and are exposed to western climatic conditions resulting in drier sclerophyll forest of tall trees dominated by spotted gum, narrow-leaved ironbark, brown bloodwood and broad-leaved white mahogany. The sparse understorey comprises acacia, casuarina and ground layer dominated by herbs, grasses (kangaroo, wiry panic and wire grass) blueberry lilies and mat-rush. Persoonia cornifolia (broad-leaf geebung), listed as regionally significant occasionally occurs. More sheltered areas in gullies and drain lines provide better soil conditions and fire protection with dominant canopy trees of grey gums, tallowwood and brush box, and well developed understorey of soap tree, cheese tree, wattles, and rainforest affinities.

Threats: Having a physical boundary with the quarry has increased the edge effects of introduced grasses and weeds, which continue to flourish from uncontrolled access and the frequency of fires. Other impacts are a direct result of access tracks to the sporting fields both across the ridges and drain lines, as well as down steep slopes.

This is causing further erosion and sedimentation in both drain lines which have been severely degraded at the transformed dump site, and severely limited the natural downstream water flow into Salvin Creek; as evidenced by vegetation removal and erosion of the main connecting drainage line.

Area 3 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Narrowest part of conservation area must be protected from most uses and have an enhanced vegetation buffer with quarry.

Access Notes : The gazetted Sankeys Rd runs through this area and should be closed. Part of the Pine Mtn Rd unsealed access track and local track runs through the eastern edge of this area. The main unsealed access track from Jones Rd to Area 1 runs through the northern edge of this area.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : Gully and drain lines with permanent ponds provide habitat values, this area is important for ground fauna movement from Salvin Creek to Sankeys Mt. The area also contains a number of dead trees and suitable tree and log hollows for a range of fauna.

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Area 4 Sankey Scrub and southern catchment of Salvin Creek

Conservation Zone


Physical features: The origins of Salvin Creek emanate from a spring fed system south of former dump site, and the combined drainage lines comprise the major catchment of Salvin Creek, which was formerly a more extensive wetland system. These catchment areas drain from steep slopes, including rocky scree, into sheltered drain lines with ephemeral ponds and rock pools, flowing into main channel of Salvin Creek through Sankey Scrub and to the quarry entrance. It can be assumed that the Salvin Creek spring originally began north of the dump site, flowing into a wetland marsh complex before entering the main creek system.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The riparian zone has a well developed canopy including areas of paperbark tea trees, restricted umbrella cheese tree, swamp box, with co-dominant grey gum, forest red gum, tallowwood, white mahogany and brush box. Understorey species include Acacia fimbriata, A. aulacocarpa, Pultenaea retusa, Leptospermum polygalifolium (wild may) and Callistemon salignus (white bottlebrush). Several species of interest in catchment and drainage lines are Eucalyptus henryi (large-leaved spotted gum) with dense understorey of Oxylobium aciculiferum (prickly shaggy-pea), Pultenaea euchila (blue-leaf bush pea), and uncommon Xanthorrhoea macronema (bottlebrush grass tree).

The Salvin Creek system contains a remnant vineforest at Sankey’s Scrub with a semi-closed tall canopy and well layered forest complex with 2 Vulnerable species Cupaniopsis shirleyana and Macadamia integrifolia, and many rainforest species of regional significance, due to their restricted distribution and poor representation in Brisbane. They are more typical of dry rainforest species occurring at Bahr’s Scrub (south of Beenleigh), Darlington Range to Mount Tamborine and Mt. Cotton/Redlands rainforests (Glen Leiper during recent personal communication).

Field reconnaissance has located several distinctive sites of occurrence outside of Sankey’s Scrub for Vulnerable speciesCupaniopsis shirleyana,; all efforts should be made to protect and enhance the habitats supporting this relic species using weed removal and revegetation techniques.

Threats: The major impacts concern the degradation of creek and land systems on the former land fill site, with toxic leaching and high nutrient loading, including stormwater run-off, that has resulted in an unacceptably high level of weed invasion from guinea grass, paspalum, camphor laurel, blue billygoat weed, lantana, easter cassia, morning glory, mile-a-minute, ochna and groundsel bush. These need to be reduced to a manageable level by proactive removal prior to flowering or fruiting.

A series of aerial photographs highlights the narrow creek system and threatened linkage from quarry and tracks causing vegetation loss, erosion and introduction of weed species and dumping of rubbish. Of particular concern is the proposal to widen Pine Mountain Road with direct impact on riparian vegetation and Sankey’s Scrub from infilling, sedimentation of creek system, and weed invasion from ongoing quarry work.

However, the potential remains for an ongoing commitment to enhance areas of disturbance within the forest by weed management, revegetation of riparian and adjoining edges, creating fire exclusion zones and allowing rainforest regeneration and ecotonal species diversity to continue.

 

Area 4 Ecological Protection Recommendations

This area has significant riparian remnant rainforest, including.Cupaniopsis shirleyana and Macadamia integrifollia (listed as Vulnerable by DoE), and Restricted species Glochidion sumatranum and Gmelina leichardtii. This area must be enhanced to protect it from quarry activities. This area is already the target of some rehabilitation and interpretive access.

Access Notes : A section of of Pine Mtn road is gazetted through this area, this road should be closed. An existing unsealed access track runs from Pine Mtn Rd to Area 3.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced weeds and grasses.

Habitat Notes : Significant forage values for Koala and other arboreal mammals due to large numbers of Eucalyptus. tereticornis, E. microcorys, E propinqua, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Lophostemon confertus and L sauveolens. This area is structurally healthy and retains significant ground layer, understorey, mid layer and canopy habitats. The rainforest areas provide significant fruit resources for a range of fauna including wallaby, echidna, powerful owls, whip birds and rainbow bee-eaters.

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Area 5 BCC Quarry:


Physical features: Extractive industry with maximum disturbance and only limited native regeneration in the northern section providing an essential buffer to the forest reserve.

Area 5 Ecological Protection Recommendations

30% to Conservation Zone balance earmarked for future restoration.

Habitat Notes : High vantage points with dead trees offers suitable roosting and hunting sites for raptors and powerful owls. This area is a valuable habitat and buffer zone for the northern boundary of the quarry.


Area 6 East of Pine Mountain

Conservation Zone


Physical features: This area has high visual qualities along the ridge line and saddle to Pine Mt. in the north, with western views to Mt. Lindesay, Mt. Barney, Flinder’s Peak and Ivory Rock, Great Dividing Range to the north-west, and Moreton Bay Islands to the east; with an excellent overview of the extensive forest systems across the reserve to Sankey’s Mountain and White’s Hill.

These high ridges extend to Pine Mountain, and provide the catchment boundary of Sankey’s Creek to the north and south to Salvin Creek, with many areas featuring rocky screed slopes and some very steep dissecting gullies which are eroding due to steep tracks. These dominant rocky screed slopes provide good moisture infiltration and also acts as a fire retardant for fire sensitive species including rainforest affinities.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: This area has significant forest with a healthy structure and wide range of tree maturity, including some excellent examples of old growth tallowwood and white mahogany. Other dominant tree species include pink bloodwood, grey gum and brush box.. Species of interest include Vulnerable species Acacia perangusta, dense clumps of basket fern, narrow-leaf Lomandra multiflora, Tricoryne anceps (flat-stemmed yellow rush-lily), rattle grass, Echinostephia aculeata (prickly tape vine), uncommon Xanthorrhoea macronema (bottlebrush grass tree) and Xanthorrhoea latifolia (flat-stemmed grass tree), and distinctive area of Eucalyptus racemosa (scribbly gum).

The availability of sub-soil moisture and rocky scree providing fire protection enables rainforest affinities to occur, such as Acacia maidenii, Acacia perangusta, Smilax australis, Olearia nernstii, Jagera pseudorhus, Notelaea longifolia, Capparis arborea and ferns Blechnum cartilagineum, Doodia aspera, Calochlaena dubia and Adiantum hispidulum.

The lower Salvin Creek gullies and drain lines are more sheltered from fire intensity and have more fertile soil conditions resulting in an upper canopy changes to forest red gum and brush box, and a well developed middle layer of soap tree, Glochidion sumatranum (buttonwood), wattles, wild may and rainforest species including foam bark tree, red kamala, barb-wire vine, Oplismenus aemulus (rainforest creek grass), Lomandra longifolia and Dianella caerulea (blueberry lily).

Threats: The major impacts concern the fire frequency which prevents plants reaching maturity (flowering and fruiting), and limiting rainforest regeneration. Some deeply eroded gullies on lower slopes have been caused by inappropriate steep tracks to Pine Mountain and forest reserve from Salvin Creek. There are high levels of weed invasion on drainage lines from guinea grass, lantana, molasses grass, paspalum and groundsel bush. These need to be reduced to a manageable level.

 

Area 6 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Extremely significant remnant old growth values and species of regional significance.

Access Notes: An existing local track running from Bendeena St to the Mian Access track may need sone realignment and rehabilitation. This track should be rerouted along the ridge towrds Area 8 before joing a local track heading to Education track and the Main access track.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas mainly on the northern and eastern boundary of this area.

Habitat Notes : Significant old growth trees with branch hollows and dead limbs. High numbers of forage trees for a range of fauna. Rock outcrops provide suitable fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna. High vantage points with dead trees offers suitable roosting and hunting sites for raptors and powerful owls.

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Area 7 Jones Road Gully

Conservation Zone


Physical features: Adjoining northern facing catchment boundary to Area 6, with excellent mountain views from high ridge line to Pine Mt. saddle, where a spectacular gully system commences, with rock outcrops, several permanent rock pools and ponds that seasonally connect to Sankey’s Creek. One particularly deep section of the major gully has banks of exposed red soils with remnant and vulnerable rainforest species.

There is an access track from west of quarry that connects to the Main access track, which has also been used as a trail bike track, resulting in erosion from vegetation and soil loss exposing rocky surface and shallow top soils. There are several rocky scree slopes and outcrops which are an important fire retardant and this allows rainforest species to regenerate.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The predominantly western and northern facing slopes of Pine Mountain comprise a dry sclerophyll open forest with interesting range of tree species including E. crebra (narrow-leaved ironbark), E. tessellaris (Moreton Bay ash or carbeen), E. trachyphloia, E. maculata, E. umbra ssp. carnea; and occasionaI Lophostemon confertus, Angophora leiocarpa (rusty gum) and A. woodsiana (smudgee).

The steep slopes have been exposed to frequent fires which has maintained a ground layer dominated by grasses and herbs, and prevented the succession of sclerophyll forest from developing; resulting in phases of vegetative regrowth without completing flowering or fruiting cycles.

The gully network has very steep banks with rock outcrops and rock pools which help protect two Vulnerable species, Acacia perangusta and discreet populations of Cupaniopsis shirleyana on either side of major gully in rocky scree, further highlighting the regional significance of White’s Hill Reserve. The adjoining gully lines have an upper stratum of brush box, grey gum, tallowwood, white mahogany, foam bark tree and soap tree, with vine scrub remnant species: Capparis arborea (brush caper berry), Clerodendron tomentosum, Alchornea ilicifolia, Mallotus philippensis, Jagera pseudorhus, Notelaea longifolia, andAlyxia ruscifolia. There are several prominent vines including Austrosteenisia blackii (blood vine), Geitonoplesium cymosum (scrrambling lily), Cayratia clematidea (slender grape) and Smilax australis.

Threats: The visual appeal of the deep gully system also means it is the focus of several steep and eroding tracks from Main access track to Pine Mountain across Salvin Creek causing soil erosion, siltation and weed invasion of moist drainage lines. The other major impact is the result of fire frequency that prevents and restricts rainforest regeneration, and including the adjoining eucalypt forest where young trees and shrubs are prevented from reaching maturity.

There are also some edge effects resulting in weed species, such as molasses grass and blue billy goat weed, which need to be physically removed and their bulk reduced to a manageable level.

 

Area 7 Ecological Protection Recommendations

This area has Cupaniopsis shirleyana and Acacia perangusta , both plants are listed as Vulnerable by DoE.

Access Notes :Local track from Gyandra St to Main track via Pine Mtn ridge lines. Part of the gazetted Sankeys Rd pases through this rea, this road should be closed.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion, Rehabilitation and revegetation along drain-lines and gullies. Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in revegetation projects and for habitat enhancement.

Habitat Notes : High conservation value from the physical features of deep gully, permanent waterholes and vulnerable rainforest species. This area provides grassland habitats and forage for some ground fauna. Rehabilitation would enhance habitat values in this area and aid species recovery. This area contains rocky outcrops which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna.

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Area 8 North of Pine Mt to Sankey Creek

Conservation Zone


Physical features: High north-western catchment to Sankey Creek, with some areas of rocky scree slopes and rock outcrops which are important fire retardant areas providing protection and shelter for basket ferns, Acacia maideni and rainforest affinities. The major gully and drainline helps form an interesting air cooling system between Sankey Mountain and eastern margins of Sankey Crk. The area has some minor gully networks which are traversed along Main access track and as a consequence is eroding in some sections.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The predominantly north-western facing slopes have a dry sclerophyll open forest with a sparse middle stratum, shrub stratum and grass understorey from frequent fires which prevent forest succession, reproduction and maturity.

The open canopy is dominated by E. trachyphloia, E. maculata, E. umbra, E. siderophloia, and E. carnea;, with occasional Acacia concurrens and Acacia aulacocarpa. and dominant understorey of kangaroo grass, wiry panic and herbs. Lower slopes and accompanying drainage lines are partially sheltered from fire intensity with upper canopy of brush box, grey gum and tallowwood, and understorey of foam bark tree, soap tree, Flindersia australis.. Acacia maideni,, Clerodendron tomentosum, Alyxia ruscifolia, basket fern and other rainforest ferns, blueberry lilly and herbs.

Threats: The major impacts concern the fire frequency and intensity that has prevented the successful regeneration of a healthy forest system, and the number of inappropriate steep tracks from Pine Mountain and includes erosion of drainage line crossing on Main access track.

 

Area 8 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Flindersia australis regrowth and significant rock outcrops.

Access Notes : Part of the gazetted Sankeys Rd pases through this area, this road should be closed. A local track runs along the southern boundry of this area and the Main access track runs along its NW edge.

Fire Notes: Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : Open forest with diverse and dominant grass and herb ground layer providing important habitat for ground fauna. This area contains rocky outcrops which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna.

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Area 9 Sankey Creek to Sankey Mt

Conservation Zone


Physical features: This area has a very important and regionally significant gully system and semi-permanent ponds that seasonally flow into Sankey Creek, with remnant vine scrub and outstanding rock outcrops. Adjoining slopes have rocky scree which are an important fire retardant when combined with cool moist air patterns, enabling rainforest regeneration to occur.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The creek line is dominated by tall upper canopy of brown bloodwood, brush box, grey gum, tallowwood, and low trees of Glochidion sumatranum (umbrella cheese tree), with an interesting remnant vine scrub dominated byToechima tenax (steelwood) and Mallotus philippensis (red kamala), Flindersia australis (crow’s ash), foam bark tree, lolly bush, soap tree, Notelaea longifolia, Cordyline rubra several ferns, the herb Aneilema acuminatum, and lianas Austrosteenisia blackii (blood vine), Cayratia clematidea (slender grape), scrambling lily and Smilax australis.

The past history of logging of crow’s ash or Australian teak tree has severely restricted species distribution, and is regionally significant due to the large numbers of regenerating species; although this remnant species does occur in the Belmont Hills and Clay Pool rainforest remnants.

The creek line and gully network has the Vulnerable species, Acacia perangusta with species of regional significance such as Rhodomyrtus psidioides (native guava), Pultenaea euchila (blue-leaf bush pea), Callistemon salignus, and Echinostephia aculeata (prickly tape vine).

The adjoining southern facing slopes of Mt Sankey feature tall semi-closed canopy of brush box, grey gum, tallowwood and pink bloodwood, and dense ground cover of Calochlaena dubia (false bracken), clumps of basket ferns, Olearia nernstii, Smilax australis, and rainforest herbs Plectranthus parviflorus, Peperomia blanda, and Aneilema acuminatum,.

Southern slopes are also dominated by rocky screed slopes which act as a fire retardant, and along with the cool moist air, gullies and drainlines has created a fire refugia as indicated by the vine forest species occurring there.

Species register for this area also includes components of other discreet gullies with the following tree species along adjoining drainage lines E. microcorys, E. propinqua and E. trachyphloia, Acacia maidenii, Acacia perangusta, Alphitonia excelsa, Allocasuarina littoralis, Daviesia villifera, Pultenaea villosa, grasses, Lomandra spp., Callistemon salignus, Leptospermum polygalifolium, Glochidion ferdinandi and Glochidion sumatranum, and Ficus coronata.

Threats: There are too many tracks leading into the Sankey Creek remnant vine scrub, and also to Sankey Mt across the northern section of creek, causing erosion and sedimentation, including several areas of severe erosion up the steep slopes to Sankey Mt from trail bike tracks.

Unfortunately, the frequent fire regime on the slopes of Mt Sankey has restricted regenerating rainforest from spreading. This can be reversed by the creation of a fire exclusion zone in this very important catchment area of steep southern gullies and cool drainage basin. There is an excellent opportunity to establish and maintain a fire exclusion zone in catchment gullies from Pine Mountain and Sankey’s Mountain that feature remnant rainforest vine scrub and integral ecotonal boundary with adjoining open forest types of brush box, grey gum and tallowwood.

Because of the frequency of use around Sankey Creek, there are some areas of weed invasion from blue billy goat weed, groundsel bush, camphor laurel and introduced grasses; these need to be physically removed and their bulk reduced to a manageable level.

 

Area 9 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Highly significant Remnant Riparian Vine forest and rock outcrops

Access Notes: Close all existing tracks in this area.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion. Needs rehabilitation and revegetation. Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and weeds.

Habitat Notes : Significant fauna values with burrows, hollow logs, tree and branch hollows. The area has a dense ground layer of false bracken and regenerating lianas which provides habitat for a range of fauna. This area contains rocky outcrops which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna. There are a high numbers of forage trees for a range of fauna.

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Area 10 West of Jones Road to Jade Street

Conservation Zone


Physical features: This area incorporates the lower drainage point for Sankey Creek with semi-permanent ponds that seasonally flow, and undulating slopes and drainage lines, with some lower northern-facing slopes of Mt Sankey featuring areas of exposed rocky scree.

This area is a major entry point into White’s Hill Reserve and has been affected by the number of access tracks across Sankey Creek and over deep gullies en route to Pine Mt quarry and to the sporting fields.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The low relief slopes to Sankey Creek is eucalypt open forest of spotted gum, broad-leaved white mahogany, brown bloodwood, grey gum, with occasional ironbark and Angophora leiocarpa (rusty gum) with regrowth middle stratum of wattles, soap tree, Jacksonia scoparia (dogwood) and areas with dense understorey of Daviesia villifera, Pultenaea villosa and Oxylobium aciculiferum.. Many areas have an open understorey associated with past logging practices and access tracks, with regrowth areas and blady grass, wiry panic, wire grass and low herbs.

Lower Sankey Creek is dominated by E. tereticornis, Lophostemon suaveolens and Melaleuca quinquenervia,, with an adjoining upper canopy of brush box, grey gum and tallowwood; with low trees of Glochidion sumatranum (umbrella cheese tree), soap tree and Callistemon salignus.. These species are indicative of the moisture concentration from alluvial deposition and higher clay content in shallow drainage basin. Unfortunately, past clearing of the creekline has reduced the upper canopy structure, with regrowth species of Acacia fimbriata, Melia azederach, Acacia maidenii,, soap tree, foam bark tree, Smilax australis and lolly bush.

Threats: The introduced grasses increase the fuel load around the margins and including lower Sankey Creek, and is often the cause of illegal fires and continual damage to regenerating forests.

There are many tracks caused by trail bikes and other users, which cross the creek system and steep gullies, and have resulted in a loss of vegetation, soil compaction and soil erosion

Because of the frequency of disturbance in and around this creek, there are extensive areas of weed invasion from blue billy goat weed, groundsel bush, camphor laurel and introduced grasses. There is a need for these weeds to be physically removed and their bulk reduced to a manageable level.

 

Area 10 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Melaleuca dominant forest on Sankey Ck

Access Notes: Part of the Main Tracks start in this area on its eastern border. Other tracks closed.

Fire Notes: Total fire exclusion fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas. Fuel reduction should focus on boundaries with Jones Rd and Indus St.

Habitat Notes : Flowering Melaleuca and E. tereticornis provide excellent forage value for a range of fauna. Wallaby and other ground fauna habitat along drain lines with dense understorey.

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Area 11 Saddle between Sankey Mt and White’s Hill

Conservation Zone


Physical features: This area is an integral component of the continuous forest within the reserve and is the upper catchment with high ridge line forming tributaries of Bulimba Creek. These steep north-facing rocky-scree slopes and steep gullies have some badly degraded and eroded tracks leading to the highest points along the saddle to White’s Hill. Some lower northern-facing slopes of Mt Sankey have areas of rocky scree slopes that are severely degraded and devoid of vegetation.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The tall open forest has a healthy tree canopy with a modified understorey from selective clearing dominated by grasses and wattle regrowth. Some indicators of moisture availability under the rocky scree and previous species composition include brush box, tallowwood, forest red gum, Acacia maidenii, Melia azederach;, with low trees of Glochidion sumatranum (umbrella cheese tree), soap tree and Callistemon salignus.. These species also occur on lower slopes and are indicative of moisture availability and fertility from alluvial deposition and higher clay content in sub-soils.

Threats: The major impacts are the frequent and continued degradation of steep gravelly slopes leading to high points along the ridge lines and the high fire frequency preventing maturity of shrub and low tree species; and maintaining an understorey of grasses; but with some minor infestation of molasses grass. The major focus should be on closing steep and badly degraded tracks in the area and the exclusion of fire to allow regeneration to occur, while monitoring changes in species composition in the area.

 

Area 11 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Catchment protection and remnant forest values

Access Notes: A local track from Indus St should run along contours to Whites Hill and Sankey’s Mt.

Fire Notes: Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : High dominant ridge line has tall trees and standing dead trees providing tree and branch hollows for nesting sites, roosting and foraging opportunities for a range of avifauna. Open forest with diverse and dominant grass and herb ground layer providing important habitat for ground fauna including wallaby, echidna, bandicoot. and reptiles.

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Area 12 White’s Hill

Conservation Zone


Physical features: This area represents the visual backdrop to the sporting fields and is a major focus of attention because of the close proximity to main entrance to sporting fields. There are several tracks from sporting fields into forest and up steep slopes very susceptible to erosion, resulting in deep scouring of tracks to White’s Hill. A bitumen circuit walking track has been constructed from amenity block to the western side of Whites Hill and south-east to the sporting fields.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: The gravelly surface near the top of White’s Hill has a modified tree and understorey layer from past logging and clearing resulting in sparse tree canopy, with several grass species and wattle regrowth. Some indicators of former species composition is due to sub-soil moisture and extensive areas of rocky scree which reduces the impact of fire, including forest red gum, tallowwood, brush box, Acacia maidenii, Melia azederach, soap tree, foam bark tree, and vines Smilax australis , slender grape and scrambling lily.

The forest canopy on lower western slopes of White’s Hill is dominated by grey gum, tallowwood, white mahogany and brown bloodwood, with brush box common and the understorey diversity dependant upon aspect and the impacts from fire regime.

Threats: There are several trail bike tracks converging on the ascent of White’s Hill which should be closed from the top, using swales, water retention bars and brush matting; and revegetated with endemic plants, and the incorporation of access barriers to prevent further degradation.

 

Area 12 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Catchment protection and remnant forest values

Low level recreation usage and buffer to sporting reserve

Access Notes: A sealed BCC track runs through this Area from Area 1 to a small circut around the summit of Whites Hill.

Fire Notes: Green fire breaks could be used to ‘fire proof’ this area. Fuel reduction through progressive removal of introduced grasses and some manual removal for use in recreation areas.

Habitat Notes : High point and dominant ridge line provides roosting and hunting sites for a range of avifauna. This area contains rocky outcrops , and associated basket fern clumps, which provide fire refugia, habitat and shelter for a range of ground dwelling fauna.

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Area 13 Eastern Forest within Salvin Creek Catchment

Private Property


Physical features: The eastern section of Salvin Creek adjoins the Brisbane City Council owned land and is the only remaining linkage for Salvin Creek to Olivia Park that maintains a viable ecological connection to other bushland remnants in Bulimba Creek. This area also features the important eastern drainage basin of Salvin Creek, with several low slopes and occasional exposed rocky scree within open forest.

Indications of water volume are highlighted by the scoured out northern bank of Salvin Creek, probably increased as a result of Salvin Creek being confined to a storwmwater pipe and filled; and documented as flooding Olivia Park following torrential rain.

Between the eastern portion of the private property and downstream development is Olivia Park which has been constructed over Salvin Creek. This remnant bushland features tall forest red gum, tallowwood, ironbark, grey gum and brush box, and has active bushland care groups undertaking weed control and forest regeneration.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure: Lower Salvin Creek has a tall upper canopy of Lophostemon confertus, E propinqua, E microcorys, and E. intermedia, with lower tree canopy of Glochidion sumatranum (umbrella cheese tree ), with remnant vine scrub species due to its close proximity to Sankey Scrub. Common species include Mallotus phillipensis, Acmena smithii, Ficus coronata, Jagera pseudorhus, Clerodendron tomentosum, Cryptocarya glaucescens, Hibiscus heterophyllus, Backhousia myrtifolia.

The diverse understorey includes native ginger, palm lillies and ferns Adiantum hispidulum, Doodia aspera, Doodia caudata, Christella dentata, herbs and lianes: Austrosteenisia blackii (blood vine), Smilax australis, Derris involuta, Pandorea pandorana, Cayratia clematidea (slender grape), and Geitonoplesium cymosum.

Adjoining gully networks have similar tree canopy, with dense shrub layer of Acacia fimbriata, Hovea acutifolia, and Leptospermum polygalifolium, with occasional Callistemon salignus, umbrella cheese tree and soap tree.

There are some steeper slopes towards Bendeena Terrace, and low relief slopes down to Salvin Creek, with mixed eucalypt open forest dominated by spotted gum, broad-leaved white mahagony, brown bloodwood, grey gum, ironbark and Angophora leiocarpa (rusty gum), with sparse shrub layer of Jacksonia scoparia, Pultenaea villosa and Daviesia villifera.

There are several species of regional interest including Caladenia catenata, (white fingers), Oxylobium aciculiferum, Oxylobium scandens, dense masses of Tricoyrne anceps (flat stemmed rush-lily) and narrow-leaved Lomandra multiflora, grass trees and Lomatia silaifolia.

Threats: Major threat facing this area relates to the possibility of future development, and problems with access causing compaction and erosion. Some southern portions of Salvin Creek have suffered from canopy removal which has been replaced by camphor laurel, small leaved privet, latana, morning glory, corky passion vine, paspalum and guinea grass.

Area 13 Ecological Protection recommendations

Should be inluded in reserve or protected with VCA or covenant.

Access Notes : nil

Fire Notes : Because of the vitally important catchment areas within Area 13, including drainage lines and riparian rainforest along Salvin Creek, this area should be totally excluded from fires to allow the continued regeneration and expansion of rainforest area.

Habitat Notes : The dense rainforest area and associated sheltered drainage lines provide forage values, movement and roosting sites for a range of fauna , with the tall eucalypt trees providing a range of forage values for koala, greater glider, nectar for possums, gliders, birds and insects. The northern and western portions have a more open understorey that is ideal habitat for herbivores (wallaby), and ground dwelling mammals, snakes, skinks and lizards. There were numerous signs of scuffed bark and scratches on tallowwood and grey gum, which are preferred food trees of the koala, diggings from bandicoot and possibly echidna, scats from koala, possum and wallaby.

There were many tree and branch hollows, as well as standing dead trees which provide roosting sites, breeding sites and shelter for a range of avifauna

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Ecological Protection Recommendations: Links from the reserve

These links are vital for the remnant to fill its ecological role in the area. They should be protected by inclusion in the green space system, catchment plans, appropriate zoning, VPO’s and VCA’s. A number of bushcare groups exist along the links from the reserve such as the Olivia Drive group. These groups should continue to expand and contribute to the rehabilitation and management of linkages in cooperation with council and private landholders.

The main links are;

North West: to Boundary rd and Norman Ck

North East : to Gyandra st and Bulimba Ck

East : to Salvins Ck to Bulimba Ck

South West: to Salvin Ck Catchment

South : to Boral Land Remnants and Salvins Ck

see attatched linkage map

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General Threats to the Remnant Bushland

Illegal Vehicle Use: However, recent field reconnaissance has revealed a marked decline in trail bike and four wheel drive damage to the forest reserve, the inclusion of exclusion fencing of the entire forest reserve would help protect and reinforce council commitment to the ecological values of preserving remnant forest habitats, free of recreational pursuits (mountain bike trails, dog exercise, and wide concrete tracks for walking, skateboards etc).

Fire: The lack of forest protection by fencing to control access has resulted in numerous tracks, soil erosion and sedimentation in gullies and drainage lines, and edge effects culminating in unacceptably high fuel levels from introduced grasses which in turn affects the forest health and regeneration processesl. Consequently, the fire frequency is too frequent largely due to illegal burning and arson.

Bulimba Creek Tributary

This small tributary was formerly spring fed from the western side of White’s Hill and unfortunately buried under a waste fill site (dump), then transformed into sporting fields and classified as open space. In reality these spring-fed tributaries of Bulimba Creek have been drastically altered by severing vegetation linkage, causing bank erosion, and with no effort made to rehabilitate the creek system.

It is recommended that creek banks are stabilised, with swales to be constructed around contours to retain water and allow infiltration into moister drainage line areas, and revegetation with endemic species complemented by brush matting, mulching and direct seeding.

The Salvin Creek system, despite these drastic alterations still flows adjacent to Carnelian Street, although leaching of toxic waste from the former dump could be a major concern and take longer to resolve. Downstream, the Pine Mt. quarry exerts great pressure on Sankey’s Scrub (remnant riparian rainforest), from infilling, quarry expansion, and other associated infrastructure, weed infestation and vegetation removal.

Impacts below the sporting fields are having a detrimental effect upon streamflow and other ecological processes, including a loss of the bushland buffer to the open space.

General Recommendations

There should be a restriction upon recreation to areas along Boundary Road, including sporting fields, open space and the revamped dump site; any future track system be restricted to these already disturbed areas.

The remainder of the reserve should be renamed, with a focus on the ecological attributes of open forest reserves, such as the placement of interpretive signage indicating the importance of particular habitats whilst restoring, protecting and enhancing ecological functions of a contiguous and undisturbed forest system.

Placement of a range of nesting boxes on suitable habitat trees would greatly enhance fauna utilisation and complement existing tree and branch hollows within the forest reserve.

The production of a self-guided interpretive map to identify significant habitat types, old growth trees and their species name, including tree and branch hollows, large hollow logs on the ground, and termite nests.

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Recovery Plan: based on a priority rating

1 Active input from all tenants/lessees to adequately provide resources to fence, rehabilitate/revegetate degraded areas, this includes barrier fencing for sporting fields from bushland and also fence off quarry areas. Quarry to be approached to revegetate riparian corridor and road access

2 Use some of the existing walking tracks, including raised footbridge over main gully on the main walking track from Jones road to White’s Hill and sporting fields

3 Actively lobby BCC to increase status and recognition of the ecological/floristic representation of White’s Hill Reserve

4 Accompanied signage with penalties for trespassing on remnant forest areas, explanatory notes on the importance of forests, alternative venues for trail-bikes, four wheel drive

5 Erosion control and construction of swales, water retention techniques and closure of access tracks

6 Weed control and management plan, as well as fuel reduction of all introduced grasses

7 Staged revegetation and allowance of natural regeneration by direct seeding and brush matting, of priority areas which are fenced and accompanied by interpretive signage on aims and benefits of project

8 Strategic placement of natural tree hollows and branch hollows for a variety of nesting boxes

9 Fauna monitoring and data collection surveys, with an emphasis upon community input (bushcare)

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