BOGGY CREEK TO KEDRON BROOK DRAFT ECOLOGICAL PROTECTION REPORT
brecnew Boggy Ck Brisbane Qld
CLICK BELOW FOR MAPS
Map 1 of Pinkenba EPR
Map 2 of Pinkenba EPR


There is an excellent opportunity to improve the habitat quality and public amenity of the Northern Brisbane Gateway Port's region through sensible incorporation of remnant vegetation. This would include strips of riparian vegetation and degraded lands in varying stages of regeneration.


Any specific habitat retention and incorporation into wildlife corridors will need to be accompanied by strategic rehabilitation works to enlarge wildlife buffers and increase available habitat resources. It is vital to the preservation and representation of plant communities and ecosystems that there is a concerted effort to maintain a viable ecological corridor and mangrove habitat as a buffer to the industry onslaught

There is an urgent need to implement this ecological protection plan by a range of local and state authorities and to seek support from business and industry groups within the proposed wildlife corridor to ensure there is an ecological balance to rapidly increasing regional development. This plan will ensure that there is a viable linkage of the estuarine ecosystems and provide a cross-section of Brisbane’s delta habitats.


Summary of Ecological Protection Recommendations

The hatched areas, excluding Pinkenba village, on Map 1 and 2 should be identified in planning schemes as conservation areas and that this be overlayed with State and Local VCA's.

AREA 1 Boggy Ck to Pinkenba

Close attention should be given to stormwater control up-slope of this area using artificial wetlands and retention basins to minimise the flow of contaminant into the conservation area. Options for widening the thinnest part of the area at the site marked A should be further examined.

The high conservation value vegetation identified in the Warton (1990) Study should be acquired by the BCC as a small urban nature park and management plan developed in conjunction with Pinkenba residents.

AREA 2 Pinkenba to Kedron Brook Linkages

To enhance the quality and robustness of the airport plantation planting, we suggest progressive replanting with locally endemic species which are non bird attracting but will provide a habitat suitable for a diverse range of fauna species. (refer to attached list from Justin Overton).

Firstly we recommend that a urgent study be done of contaminants leaving the BACL site. We furthermore recommend that the BACL undertake works, on its properties, to prevent these contaminants entering Queensland waters.

AREA 3 Kedron Brook and Floodplains

We recommend that a restoration and recovery plan for this area be developed after further on ground assessments. Nonetheless this area should still be identified as a conservation area in the planning scheme and should be investigated for possible BCC acquisition.

That further research be undertaken to assess the impacts of run off, historical dumping and contaminated sites in this area.


 

Boggy Ck Brisbane Qld

 

Area 1 - Boggy Creek and Linkages

Physical Features

Boggy Creek is a tidal creek system with integral linkages to the broader Brisbane River delta system of braided mangrove streams and channels, and incorporates the valuable habitat of Bulwer Island. This area is vital to the preservation and representation of plant communities and ecosystems. This area also plays an important part of the ecological processes associated with sustaining the Brisbane River Delta and Moreton Bay

The area has very low-lying estuarine topography displaying a broad variation in microrelief. Small changes, as little as 20cm in height can have dramatic effects on soil properties and vegetation. While limited testing has shown the having low total acid sulphate potential, further testing is required to fully assess potential risks.

The predominant soils are a result of stratified marine muds over time, with elevated soils such as creek banks comprising a sandy loam of varying depths approximately 25- 75 millimetres overlaying a heavy grey clay which exhibits varying levels of lateritic mottling due to weathering of the underlying sandstones.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure

There are several small vegetation remnants remaining after clearing, grazing, dumping, filling and horticultural production (orchards).

Along the braided channels, creeks and estuarine ecosystems the major mangrove species are Avicennia marina (grey mangrove), Aegiceras corniculatum (river mangrove), and occasional Ceriops tagal (yellow mangrove), particularly in tidal tributary and outer margins of Boggy Creek to varying heights (4-12 metres) depending on the condition of the original forest.

Marine floodplains of saltwater couch and samphires

Existing plants adjacent to Boggy Creek include Suaeda australis, Suaeda arbusculoides (seablites), Sesuvium portulacastrum (sea purslane), Sarcocornia quinquefolia, Halosarcia spp., (Samphires), Cyperus polystachyos (sedge), Juncus krausii (saltwater rush), Schoenus sp. (club-sedge), and Fimbristylis sp. (fringe rush).

Terrestrial loam soils

These include trees: Eucalyptus tereticornis (forest red gum/Queensland blue gum), E. tessellaris (carbeen, Moreton Bay ash), Casuarina glauca (swamp oak/grey buloak) and Cupaniopsis anacardioides (tuckeroo).

Habitat Values

The fringing mangrove communities are particularly diverse and represent the most tangible of wildlife corridors with close proximity to Boggy Creek, Bulwer Island, Luggage Point, Juno Point Fisherman Islands and Moreton Bay.

The remnant forests north-west of the Pinkenba triangle has high conservation values which have been documented in an impact study by Dr. Kevin Warton (1990), Zoology Department of the University of Queensland.

The important mangrove and marine floodplain communities provide habitat for mangrove kingfishers, rainbow bee-eaters, tree martins, mangrove golden whistler, striated pardalote (nesting in creek banks), Pacific black duck, white-faced heron, royal spoonbill, straw-necked ibis, egrets, brown quail and grey shrike-thrush. As a regulator and chief predator, raptors are often present: brahminy kite, black-shouldered kite, collared sparrowhawk, whistling kite, osprey, swamp harrier, brown goshawk, and white-bellied sea eagle; including nocturnal predators such as grass owl, southern boobook and tawny frogmouth owls.

The saltwater couch communities are an integral component of the fringing mangroves by acting as a powerful and highly efficient filtration system trapping silt, sediment, pollution and rubbish from entering and degrading the estuarine ecology and wellbeing of the mangrove ecosystems. Despite minor disturbance to sections of these areas, the estuarine fauna is surprisingly healthy and robust.

Threats:

The major cause for concern is the approved and semi-approved development and infilling of the delta systems comprising braided channels and creek systems.

These areas suffer from introduced grasses and herbs which are limiting natural regeneration, compounded by the linear strip of vegetation, exposure to winds and lack of seed resource for the successful regeneration process.

Area 1 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Habitat Notes

The hatched areas marked on Map 1, excluding Pinkenba Village, be identified in the planning scheme as conservation areas and backed up with Local and State level VCA's.

On the north side of Boggy Creek emphasis should be given to exploring options to widen the corridor at the site marked A on Map 1. Limited field replanting trials of marine cooch and samphires has been successful and bode well for the rehabilitation of these communities.

Potential Linkages

As a major component of the linkages within the region, Boggy Creek is a tidal creek system with integral linkages to the broader Brisbane River delta system of braided mangrove streams and channels, and incorporates the valuable habitat of Bulwer Island. Boggy Creek provides the core to habitat linkages to the Brisbane River mouth, north of the Brisbane River to Nudgee Beach and to the Enoggera Creek corridor.

Pollution Monitoring and Control

It is vitally important that there is a sufficient buffer in this area to upstream development in the form of a series of artificial wetlands and retention basins to trap nutrients, sediment and pollutants and ensure the long term stability and viability of floodplain and estuarine ecosystems.

Boggy Ck Brisbane Qld

Area 2: Pinkenba to Kedron Brook Linkages

Physical Features

These areas are characterised by massive disruption to the region’s ecosystems through intensive and extensive clearing, grazing, agriculture and more recently from changes in micro-relief of the delta and marine floodplains through development and infilling. This section has also been historically altered from the airport construction; and another section from Lomandra Drive to Pinkenba fuel bunkers has a sewer line.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure

Most of the area comprises of regrowth, small remnants and introduced grasses and weeds, as well as the massive plantation revegetation of Casuarina glauca (swamp oak/grey buloak) for the airport.

Because of the changes in micro-relief and alterations, much of the remnant vegetation has been removed; however, the remaining areas are similar to Area 1; especially the marine flood plain communities of saltwater couch and samphires along the altered drainage channels and adjoining areas.

Slightly elevated and therefore better drained soils have remnant trees including Eucalyptus tereticornis (forest red gum/Queensland blue gum), E. tessellaris (carbeen, Moreton Bay ash), Casuarina glauca (swamp oak/grey buloak) and Cupaniopsis anacardioides (tuckeroo).

Habitat Values

The more disturbed habitat and regrowth areas dominated by open grassed areas, with saltwater couch and sparse shrub layer provides habitat for brown quail, double-barred finch, zebra finch, red-browed firetail and several wrens, white eyes, golden-headed cisticola.

There appear to be high numbers of ground fauna including antechinus, bandicoot, reptiles, amphibians and diverse insects, including marine and mangrove organisms; and confirmed by the range of raptors utilising resources in the area.

Threats

Section 1: long neck to Kedron Brook has sections of artificially changed elevation from filling for the airport development, with surface run-off carrying pollutants kerosene and cadmium containing particles from aeroplane tyres.

Similarly, there is insufficient research on the impacts of high pollution levels on the raptor populations or on their effects on the dynamics of the different ecosystems.

Section 2; Fuel bunkers of Ampol also has raised soil levels which may require reconstruction with a sandy-loam to ensure a long term and successful revegetation program utilising locally endemic species.

Area 2 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Habitat Notes

To enhance the quality and robustness of the airport plantation planting, we suggest progressive replanting with locally endemic species which are non bird attracting but will provide a habitat suitable for a diverse range of fauna species. (refer to attached list from Justin Overton).

The hatched areas on Map 2, excluding Pinkenba Village, should be protected in the same way as Area 1 with planning schemes and VCA's.

Pollution Monitoring and Control

Firstly we recommend that an urgent study be done of contaminants leaving the BACL site. We furthermore recommend that the BACL undertake works, on its properties, to prevent these contaminants entering Queensland waters. This requires further investigation prior to specific ecological protection recommendations; however, properly constructed retention basins in the airport area may facilitate the remediation of pollution run-off.

Area 3: Kedron Brook and Floodplains

Physical Features

This area has several diverted creek channels which has altered the soil types and their ability to function. The effects of these changes to the hydrology of the delta system, such as infiltration and surface flow alterations are unknown because they have not been quantified and therefore may have a detrimental effect upon the drainage patterns.

Floristic Characteristics and Structure

The vegetation remnants are similar to Area 1 depending on the level of disturbance. The area has very low lying estuarine topography displaying a broad variation in microrelief. Small changes, as little as 20cm in height can have dramatic effects on soil properties and vegetation. The braided channels and creeks are dominated by Avicennia marina (grey mangrove) and Aegiceras corniculatum (river mangrove), with occasional Ceriops tagal (yellow mangrove), particularly in tidal tributary and outer margins of Kedron Brook and estuary of varying heights (4-12 metres).

Existing plants adjacent to Boggy Creek include Suaeda australis, Suaeda arbusculoides (seablites), Sesuvium portulacastrum (sea purslane), Sarcocornia quinquefolia, Halosarcia spp., (Samphires), Cyperus polystachyos (sedge), and Juncus krausii (saltwater rush).

More elevated and better drained soils comprise Eucalyptus tereticornis (forest red gum/Queensland blue gum), E. tessellaris (carbeen, Moreton Bay ash), Casuarina glauca (swamp oak/grey buloak) and Cupaniopsis anacardioides (tuckeroo).

Threats

The impacts in this area are considered severe from over-clearing, grazing and subsequent weed invasion from castor oil plant, grasses, lantana, broad-leaved pepper tree, wild sunflower and wild tobacco.

Area 3 Ecological Protection Recommendations

Habitat Notes

We recommend that a restoration and recovery plan for this area be developed after further on ground assessments. Nonetheless this area should still be identified as a conservation area in the planning scheme and should be investigated for possible BCC acquisition.

Potential Linkages

The creek systems of the Kedron Brook floodplains create an opportunity to incorporate linkages to the wetlands to north and to the freshwater ecosystems and inland vegetation types of the Kedron Brook Catchment.

Pollution Monitoring and Control

As BREC has yet to assess the impacts of historical dumping and contaminated sites in this area and we offer no specific pollution control recommendations at this time.

 

BREC acknowledges the support of BRATS
in the compilation of this Draft Ecological Protection Report

Bayside Residents Against Toxic Sites(BRATS)

 

Potential Species for revegetation in Area 1

Revegetation species have been categorised in two sections:

1 – marine floodplains of saltwater couch and samphires

2 – terrestrial loam soils of elevated banks of Boggy Creek and adjoining braided channels

The major mangrove species are Avicennia marina (grey mangrove), Aegiceras corniculatum (river mangrove), and occasional Ceriops tagal (yellow mangrove), particularly in tidal tributary of Boggy Creek

1 – marine floodplains of saltwater couch and samphires

Broad strategies will include utilising machinery to transplant Sporobolus virginicus (saltwater couch) and larger areas of samphires, with manual removal of individual species including planting cuttings.

Suggested species for successful revegetation should include existing plants: Suaeda australis, Suaeda arbusculoides (seablites), Sesuvium portulacastrum (sea purslane), Sarcocornia quinquefolia, Halosarcia spp., Sclerostegia spp., (Samphires), Arthrocnemum sp. (salt grass), Cyperus polystachyos (sedge), Juncus krausii (saltwater rush) Schoenus sp. (club-sedge), and Fimbristylis sp. (fringe rush)

On more favourable sites with less saline inundation can include Phragmites australis (Australian reed grass), Juncus usitatus (rush), Lepironia spp. (spike-rush), and Crinum pedunculatum (Brisbane lily)

2 – Terrestrial loam soils

To enhance the ecosystem and habitat potential of the area it is suggested to use the following species and to include a range of endemic plants from different forest strata (trees, low trees, shrubs, herbs and grasses). Part of this strategy should include using wattles because of their features: fast growing, soil enrichment, nitrogen fixation, shade producing to suppress weeds, early flowering to attract a wide variety of insects, birds, and nectar feeding bats and possums.

Suitable wattle species:

Acacia maideni (Maiden’s wattle)

Acacia fimbriata (Brisbane wattle)

Acacia aulacocarpa (hickory wattle)

Acacia leiocalyx (black wattle)

Trees:

Angophora leiocarpa (rusty gum)

Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay fig)

Ficus obliqua (small-leaved Moreton Bay fig)

Eucalyptus siderophloia (grey ironbark)

Corymbia intermedia (pink bloodwood)

Jagera pseudorhus (foam bark tree)

Hibiscus tiliaceus (cottonwood)

Callistemon salignus (paperbark bottlebrush)

Callitris columellaris (white cypress pine)

Melia azederach (white cedar)

Toechima tenax (steelwood)

Elaeocarpus obovatus (hard quandong)

Pandanus tectorius (screw palm)

Livistonia australis (cabbage tree palm)

Alphitonia excelsa (red ash/soap tree)

Cryptocarya triplinervis (three-veined laurel)

Lophostemon suaveolens (swamp box)

Polyalthia nitidissima (polyalthia)

Planchonella australis (black plum)

 

 

 

Shrubs and small trees:

Notelaea longifolia (veiny mock-olive)

Macaranga tanarius (native poplar)

Leptospermum polygalifolium (wild may)

Alectryon coriaceus (beach tamarind)

Acronychia imperforata (coastal aspen)

Pipturus argenteus (native mulberry)

Breynia oblongifolia (coffee bush)

Exocarpos latifolius (broad-leaved native cherry)

Maclura cochinchinensis (cockspur thorn)

Pittosporum revolutum (rusty-leaved laurel)

Syzygium oleosum (blue lilly pilly)

Glochidion ferdinandi (cheese tree)

Dodonaea triquetra (hop bush)

Myoporum acuminatum (coastal boobialla)

Guioa semiglauca (guioa)

Wikstroemia indica (bootlace bush)

Trema tomentosa (poison peach)

 

Vines and creepers:

Ipomoea pes-caprae (coast morning glory)

Geitonoplesium cymosum (scrambling lily)

Eustrephus latifolius (wombat berry)

Stephania japonica (tape vine)

Parsonsia straminea (monkey rope/twining silk pod)

Hardenbergia violacea (purple coral-pea)

Myoporum debile

Cissus opaca (small-leaf water vine)

Grasses, sedges, rushes and herbs:

Pteridium esculentum (bracken fern)

Gahnia aspera (red-fruited saw-sedge)

Lomandra longifolia (spiny-headed mat-rush)

Dianella caerulea (blueberry lily)

Ottochloa gracilima (graceful grass)